Forum Replies Created

Viewing 1 - 10 of 74 posts
  • Jayse

    June 26, 2007 at 3:03 pm

    Hmmm – not sure if that’s a version difference or not – have you tried CS3? Maybe get the trial and see.

    Usually for centering things by brute force I’ll add to my actions the following:

    Select>All
    Layer>Align to selection>Horizontal Centers
    (same)>vertical centers

    Just make sure the layer you want to center is selected of course.

    Hope that helps!

    // jayse

    http://www.xeler8r.com

    Ultimate After Effects Video Training CDs


    Free Photoshop CS Video Tutorials

  • Jayse

    May 1, 2007 at 12:11 am

    >>It would be ashame that your IT guy would be the deciding factor.

    Wouldn’t it!

    >>So when you’re talking about running a handful of PC, it’s a lot more of a headache on a PC. 🙂

    I think that’s the fear right – the need of job security. 😉

    >>It’s hard to make an argument on how an 8 Core won’t improve your workflow.

    I will be putting the 8 core to work in my personal workflow – even if my company doesn’t. I’ve been waiting a long time for a machine that had a little speed.

    >>BTW, if you start using Motion, you’ll have to post some new tutorials about it. 😛

    heheh – you got it!

    // jayse

    Ultimate After Effects Video Training CDs


    Free Photoshop CS Video Tutorials

  • Jayse

    April 26, 2007 at 5:27 pm

    Thanks for the reply Todd!

    “You mean you didn’t spend all your time at NAB answering this question?”

    Heheh – of course i did – but you see i have very skewed vision with these things. I need more objective feedback.

    i love the new features of both – but I want a good longterm solution and you are correct: the users of this will NOT be big ae users – so that opens it up a bit.

    I think this may actually come down to the fact that our IT isn’t as familiar with Apple as with Windows boxes – as simple as that sounds, it may be the deciding factor more than anything else.

    Thanks so much for the feedback! Appreciated!

    // jayse

    and PS – Motion/Color/Soundtrack/FCP – has my hand on the 8-core-BUY-IT-NOW-trigger!

    Ultimate After Effects Video Training CDs


    Free Photoshop CS Video Tutorials

  • Jayse

    March 31, 2006 at 8:16 pm

    Or you just use the radial wipe effect – just apply and animate one parameter. It’s tyte for any circular reveals (such as rainbows)

    Hope that helps!

    // jayse

    Ultimate After Effects Video Training CDs


    Free Photoshop CS Video Tutorials

  • Jayse

    March 3, 2006 at 2:49 am

    typically what I’ll do is make the PS file at least twice as big as I need. Keep all the layers in PS – save – import as composition in AE.

    Then turn all layers 3d except the background.

    Then change the z-depth of each – forwards and back
    Then change the scale of each to compenate for the z-depth

    Then animate your cam…

    I think maybe you were skipping the scaling step so they didn’t align anymore.

    Hope that helps!

    // jayse

    Ultimate After Effects Video Training CDs


    Free Photoshop CS Video Tutorials

  • Jayse

    March 3, 2006 at 2:42 am

    or just double click the icon in the layers palette – viola!

    (and you can also add a color overlay layerstyle)

    Ultimate After Effects Video Training CDs


    Free Photoshop CS Video Tutorials

  • Jayse

    March 3, 2006 at 2:41 am

    it will most likely look like heck tho – so I’d suggest recreating it from scratch at the higher resolution. Think of it as really good photoshop training to have to do it all over again. the Lesson is: don’t do it at 72dpi!

    Another thought tho – is that this could be 72dpi at 33inches big. If that’s the case – following Dels advice above, add in that you don’t want ‘resample’ turned on. This will change the dpi to 300 without loss of quality (and result in a smaller print size)

    hope that helps!

    // jayse

    Ultimate After Effects Video Training CDs


    Free Photoshop CS Video Tutorials

  • Jayse

    March 3, 2006 at 2:38 am

    Not sure what you mean by ‘point-to-pixel’ size

    But standard NTSC DV size is 720×480 with a .9 aspect ratio – (Non-square pixels)

    A lot of people save their images as 720×540 – then squish these down for DV…

    Standard PAL is 720×576 i believe

    As with all these things tho – make sure you ask your editor exactly what he needs. Don’t guess.

    hope that helps,

    // jayse

    Ultimate After Effects Video Training CDs


    Free Photoshop CS Video Tutorials

  • Jayse

    March 3, 2006 at 2:34 am

    Kim had some good answers – here’s mine for the rest:

    1. Only true if you save out a flattened jpg at 72dpi of your image… then you will lose the crisp lines. But as Kim said – this is not longer such an issue. The main reason for using Illustrator/InDesign now is if you are doing stuff like 2 color print jobs etc. where it’s generally easier to get separations from.

    2. Could be too high a resolution. Just depends on your final print size and your printer’s lpi. 225dpi is a standard for a lot of printers. Always find out the exact details from the printers. They’re used to answering those kinds of questions – and every printer is different. Some – for instance – will want the file in RGB as they’ll have better CMYK conversion through their RIP.

    3. If it’s CMYK this is a preview issue. Typically. Same thing for Pagemaker and InDesign. As you notice – goes back to normal – so it’s a working problem.

    4. It’s because you’re using transparency… in the PDF settings select ‘unchanged’ or whatever under color mode (ie: not CMYK, not RGB)

    5. Your prepress expert is somewhat right. You CAN buy an excellent hooded monitor/calibration kit (1k+) and calibrate it exactly to the printer that you are outputting to – and, depending on seasonal weather changes, humidity, temparature, ambient lighting, paper stock etc. you MAY get close. The other common thing is to get a ‘match print’ from the printer. These are typically anywhere from $45 – $90 and will provide the most accurate way of seeing what you’r final will be. Taking a sample to the printer is always good – they can tweak a lot for you if they’re good. Still – it will NOT be perfect. Ever.

    Explaining these things to freelance clients is essential. Explaining them to corporations is even more important. The color of their brand is an extremely sensitive thing.

    If color is really important – buy a pantone book (buy a new one every year as the colors will alter with time) – Then design by the book – NOT by what you see on the screen. It’s a bit odd – like designing by numbers – but when your printer gets the instructions for Pantone colors – they are fairly accurate to what your client picked out.

    Hope that helps!

    // jayse

    Ultimate After Effects Video Training CDs


    Free Photoshop CS Video Tutorials

  • Jayse

    March 3, 2006 at 2:15 am

    if you’re looking for suggestions on setup – it often depends on what you’re doing in PS. 98% of the time i have just my PS doc and my tool pallette open on my wide screen and that’s my main focus. I move all my pallettes over to the secondary. I stretch my layers pallette from top to bottom and it’s the fist thing (on the left) on the second monitor. I typically close all other panels – except maybe the Character/paragraph palette which I like to always be open.

    Otherwise I like to focus on the art/design. I’ll sometimes hit Tab or shift tab to hide the palettes – and i like hitting f – f – f, which gets me into a very focused mode. Clears everything. 🙂

    If I’m painting – i also have the color swatches up – and the brush palette.

    If I’m designing for the web – or working with vectors – often i’ll do ‘window > arrange> new window for “xxxx.psd” and have two views of the same doc open at the same time. One will be zoomed in – and the other ALWAYS at exactly 100% so I can see how my zoomed in changes are truly affecting the design. This also prevents the annoying vectorshape ‘outline’ as that is only present in the currently active window.

    Hope that helps – welcome to dual monitors – you’ll never go back. 🙂

    // jayse

    Ultimate After Effects Video Training CDs


    Free Photoshop CS Video Tutorials

Viewing 1 - 10 of 74 posts

We use anonymous cookies to give you the best experience we can.
Our Privacy policy | GDPR Policy