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  • Angelo Lorenzo

    December 9, 2014 at 11:45 pm

    You’re able to hear as many audio tracks as you have, the final mix buss for the sequence is just in stereo.

    If you, say, want 5.1 monitoring and have the hardware to monitor it properly then you would set:

    Number of audio tracks: 1
    Channel format: 5.1

    If you need an arbitrary number of channels and, again, have the hardware to monitor such as discrete channels (or need channels for broadcast output)

    Number of audio tracks: 8 (example)
    Channel Format: Mono

    You may need to go to preferences > Audio hardware and adjust/assign settings as needed.

    You cannot mix channel formats (have a track of stereo with a track of 5.1). You would have to mux your delivered file after the fact in something like FFMPEG or Squeeze or another broadcast encoder.

    ——————–
    Angelo Lorenzo

    Need to encode ProRes on your Windows PC?
    Introducing ProRes Helper, an awesome little app that makes it possible
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  • Angelo Lorenzo

    December 9, 2014 at 11:26 pm

    Apples to oranges – Premiere uses Apple’s native (MOV, TERRIBLE quality) or MainConcepts(MP4, decent quality/speed) while Elemental uses in-house developed codecs (my bet is a fork of x264). There are a lot of variables that can be fine tuned in terms of quality over speed which makes comparing 8bit and 10bit a little bit muddy.

    You may find x264 through the use of the command line app FFMPEG to be of better quality than MainConcepts if you want something to deploy to your client on the cheap. If you’re on Windows then XMedia Recode is an excellent front end (site is in german, app is in english) that will expose you to a lot of those fine tune settings so you don’t have to go through pages of command line options.

    ——————–
    Angelo Lorenzo

    Need to encode ProRes on your Windows PC?
    Introducing ProRes Helper, an awesome little app that makes it possible
    Fallen Empire Digital Production Services – Los Angeles
    RED transcoding, on-set DIT, and RED Epic rental services
    Fallen Empire – The Blog
    A blog dedicated to filmmaking, the RED workflow, and DIT tips and tricks
    Can your post production question fit in a tweet? Follow me on Twitter

  • Angelo Lorenzo

    November 7, 2014 at 5:50 am

    Use encapsulated AAF. It brings in audio with minimal name mangling (usually a _# for channel number or _R or _L for stereo tracks).

    Otherwise feature request to Adobe.

    ——————–
    Angelo Lorenzo

    Need to encode ProRes on your Windows PC?
    Introducing ProRes Helper, an awesome little app that makes it possible
    Fallen Empire Digital Production Services – Los Angeles
    RED transcoding, on-set DIT, and RED Epic rental services
    Fallen Empire – The Blog
    A blog dedicated to filmmaking, the RED workflow, and DIT tips and tricks
    Can your post production question fit in a tweet? Follow me on Twitter

  • Angelo Lorenzo

    November 7, 2014 at 3:29 am

    Download Davinci Resolve Lite, bring the clip in and do scene change detection, export the result as final cut XML. Import the XML into Premiere and relink to the file. You should have cuts IIRC.

    Speedgrade has scene change detection, but it doesn’t respect through edits and won’t give you an EDL with all the scene changes.

    There are other tools like Digital Rebellion’s Pro Media tools (Edit detector, costs money) or FFMPEG (super hacky way of doing it and steep learning curve)

    ——————–
    Angelo Lorenzo

    Need to encode ProRes on your Windows PC?
    Introducing ProRes Helper, an awesome little app that makes it possible
    Fallen Empire Digital Production Services – Los Angeles
    RED transcoding, on-set DIT, and RED Epic rental services
    Fallen Empire – The Blog
    A blog dedicated to filmmaking, the RED workflow, and DIT tips and tricks
    Can your post production question fit in a tweet? Follow me on Twitter

  • Angelo Lorenzo

    November 7, 2014 at 3:24 am

    After Effects, specifically a bundled application launched from an After Effects menu called Mocha. Mocha is a planar tracker so it trakcs flat planes in space; i.e. it is great for motion tracking things like screen replacements, signs on flat surfaces, etc. Mocha comes with an excellent help manual that walks you through what it’s like to track a cell phone screen.

    I might suggest tracking your shot backwards. Set your tracking points when the truck is near and auto track backwards as it grows smaller. You’ll need some manual adjustment at the extremes (when it’s too small or as it leaves frame) but Mocha is easy to learn.

    ——————–
    Angelo Lorenzo

    Need to encode ProRes on your Windows PC?
    Introducing ProRes Helper, an awesome little app that makes it possible
    Fallen Empire Digital Production Services – Los Angeles
    RED transcoding, on-set DIT, and RED Epic rental services
    Fallen Empire – The Blog
    A blog dedicated to filmmaking, the RED workflow, and DIT tips and tricks
    Can your post production question fit in a tweet? Follow me on Twitter

  • Angelo Lorenzo

    November 7, 2014 at 3:16 am

    Ideally you unlink the audio from the video and/or don’t include it in the multicam sequence to begin with. From there I edit in the timeline with the synced audio under the video and I cut to my heart’s content. Usually multicam is simple enough where I’m making mostly angle changes, extracts and so on so I don’t touch the source monitor until it’s time for b-roll.

    In your situation, you can open a multicam clip as a timeline sequence. Export each track of audio separately, noise reduce it, and drop it back into the multicam sequence overwriting the original audio. Super simple, no need to worry about relinking or hoping your cuts stay in tact.

    ——————–
    Angelo Lorenzo

    Need to encode ProRes on your Windows PC?
    Introducing ProRes Helper, an awesome little app that makes it possible
    Fallen Empire Digital Production Services – Los Angeles
    RED transcoding, on-set DIT, and RED Epic rental services
    Fallen Empire – The Blog
    A blog dedicated to filmmaking, the RED workflow, and DIT tips and tricks
    Can your post production question fit in a tweet? Follow me on Twitter

  • Angelo Lorenzo

    November 6, 2014 at 7:05 am

    [Pier-Philippe Chevigny]
    Digital Reference Level must be at –20dBFS.”

    Digital reference is usually “dial norm” or average level. Use audio effects > special > loudness radar to measure this to approximately -20. This USUALLY DOES NOT MEAN SLAP ON A LIMITER AT -20db. A reference level is to compare dbFS (digital, 0db max) to analog levels like dbu; -20dBFS = 0dBU in this instance. In other words, 20db in headroom between average level and digital maximum.

    [Pier-Philippe Chevigny] “8) FOR COMMERCIAL PRESENTATION ONLY – Audio levels must not exceed a loudness level of 82dB leq. This is an average loudness over the length of the spot.”

    “82dB leq” is meaningless in this context. This might be a loudness reading in the theater, but you have no context as to what digital dBFS level translates to this volume. Ask for clarification.

    ——————–
    Angelo Lorenzo

    Need to encode ProRes on your Windows PC?
    Introducing ProRes Helper, an awesome little app that makes it possible
    Fallen Empire Digital Production Services – Los Angeles
    RED transcoding, on-set DIT, and RED Epic rental services
    Fallen Empire – The Blog
    A blog dedicated to filmmaking, the RED workflow, and DIT tips and tricks
    Can your post production question fit in a tweet? Follow me on Twitter

  • Angelo Lorenzo

    November 6, 2014 at 6:51 am

    Use the “media browser” panel in Premiere. This will actively recognize the folder structure for XF, P2, AVCHD, and so on so you import the clips with the proper name and spanned properly. From the sound of it, you’re importing straight by dragging folders/files in and this would be incorrect (or, less correct) way to do it.

    I don’t know Prelude too well but it may allow similar custom naming on transfer/transcode but I can’t speak too much about it.

    ——————–
    Angelo Lorenzo

    Need to encode ProRes on your Windows PC?
    Introducing ProRes Helper, an awesome little app that makes it possible
    Fallen Empire Digital Production Services – Los Angeles
    RED transcoding, on-set DIT, and RED Epic rental services
    Fallen Empire – The Blog
    A blog dedicated to filmmaking, the RED workflow, and DIT tips and tricks
    Can your post production question fit in a tweet? Follow me on Twitter

  • Angelo Lorenzo

    November 6, 2014 at 6:34 am

    XF is a metadata dependent format. You’d have to do some tests to see how sensitive various apps in your workflow are to renaming since XF also has spanned clips. Some are, some really really aren’t.

    Thoughts:
    1. Most XF cameras should allow you at least a camera abbreviation and a starting clip number. Make sure your shooters are setting it every morning. This may be an acceptable alternative if your workflow tests don’t favor renaming.

    2. Bring MXF into Premiere in a new “simple” project with no bins. Import clips, select all clips, and go to file > Export > batch list. Open the CSV file in Excel (or similar) and assign new file names; Excel will figure it out if the name ends with a sequential number. Save batch list. In your editorial project go to file > import batch list and import/relink the files. This should quickly allow you to rename how these files appear in the media bin while still maintaining the folder structure and name of the original files.

    3. Use intermediate files. Intermediate files should carry over a reel number/reel name so you can batch rename the resulting ProRes or DNxHD MXF without fear future uprezzing/conforming being totally broken.

    ——————–
    Angelo Lorenzo

    Need to encode ProRes on your Windows PC?
    Introducing ProRes Helper, an awesome little app that makes it possible
    Fallen Empire Digital Production Services – Los Angeles
    RED transcoding, on-set DIT, and RED Epic rental services
    Fallen Empire – The Blog
    A blog dedicated to filmmaking, the RED workflow, and DIT tips and tricks
    Can your post production question fit in a tweet? Follow me on Twitter

  • Angelo Lorenzo

    November 6, 2014 at 6:17 am

    In most instances, you don’t need audio as part of your multicam. I multicam video only and sync audio to that multicam sequence in a new timeline. The exception is obviously something where the audio NEEDS to follow video like cutting between anchors at a sporting event, etc.

    I would suggest bringing in the original full audio clips (or extracting the audio from the video clips if you’re using that) and noise reducing the full clips, then relinking them in Premiere, effectively replacing the noisy original audio.

    Audio processing time is minimal, as is the storage overhead to create a second version of a project’s audio in most cases.

    ——————–
    Angelo Lorenzo

    Need to encode ProRes on your Windows PC?
    Introducing ProRes Helper, an awesome little app that makes it possible
    Fallen Empire Digital Production Services – Los Angeles
    RED transcoding, on-set DIT, and RED Epic rental services
    Fallen Empire – The Blog
    A blog dedicated to filmmaking, the RED workflow, and DIT tips and tricks
    Can your post production question fit in a tweet? Follow me on Twitter

Viewing 1 - 10 of 1,682 posts

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