Forum Replies Created

Viewing 1 - 10 of 27 posts
  • Robert Monaghan

    November 22, 2013 at 9:44 am

    Hi Mikaela,

    As far as the Phantom goes, I now offer an Avid MC plugin for Phantom. It works on Mac at the moment, with a Windows version in a week or two. These can let you transcode to DNxHD.

    Unlike the other packages you are referring to, the color will be dead-on and Time Code will match what the camera generated, exactly.

    Here is the catch:
    The package has only been tested with MC 6.5.x and MC 7.0.x. I am not sure that it would work with MC 5.5.

    Another option is our QuickTime component for the Mac. This will also work with MC and should work with the earlier versions like MC5.5. If you AMA link to the Cine file, you should be able to transcode to any flavor of DNxHD that you desire.

    The plugins are GPU accelerated and will generate frames as fast as the DNxHD compression engine take them.

    You might also be able to use a demo of MC 7.0 to do the transcodes, too. This can hold you over until the facility is able to upgrade their MC seat.

    Hope this helps!

    Bob.

    Robert Monaghan, CEO
    Glue Tools LLC
    POBox 24124
    Santa Barbara, CA, 93121
    United States

    tel: +1 805 456 7997
    fax: +1 805 456 7998

    http://www.gluetools.com

  • Robert Monaghan

    July 25, 2013 at 4:18 pm

    I just posted a release version for the Mac users.
    I am working on a release for Windows 7 – 32 & 64-bit.
    Very soon!

    bob.

    Robert Monaghan, CEO
    Glue Tools LLC
    POBox 24124
    Santa Barbara, CA, 93121
    United States

    tel: +1 805 456 7997
    fax: +1 805 456 7998

    http://www.gluetools.com

  • Robert Monaghan

    October 25, 2012 at 2:24 pm

    quote:
    “Any ARRI love in the future?”

    Perhaps..

    bob.

    Robert Monaghan, CEO
    Glue Tools LLC
    POBox 24124
    Santa Barbara, CA, 93121
    United States

    tel: +1 805 456 7997
    fax: +1 805 456 7998

    http://www.gluetools.com

  • Robert Monaghan

    October 23, 2012 at 8:29 pm

    Believe me, it is a pretty good update. The responsiveness of the app with our software is simply amazing.
    I have been thoroughly impressed with how effortless playback seems. Even on a laptop.

    But don’t take my word for it. Play with it!
    I will see if I can post some Phantom Cine files on our FTP Server, for those of you that don’t have a Phantom Camera laying around.

    bob.

    Robert Monaghan, CEO
    Glue Tools LLC
    POBox 24124
    Santa Barbara, CA, 93121
    United States

    tel: +1 805 456 7997
    fax: +1 805 456 7998

    http://www.gluetools.com

  • Robert Monaghan

    November 2, 2011 at 4:39 pm

    Actually, the Flex does have TimeCode out. It is a valid and unique timecode signature based (roughly) on the time of day of the shot. When the KiPro records from the back of a Flex, it gets this very same timecode.

    Also, I am working on an update to the Phantom Cine Toolkit to generate a Timecode track that matches the output from the Flex/KiPro. Stay tuned.

    (And for those of you that are interested, work has progressed nicely on a new Control tool to download Cines on the mac.)

    bob.

    Robert Monaghan, CEO
    Glue Tools LLC
    POBox 24124
    Santa Barbara, CA, 93121
    United States

    tel: +1 805 456 7997
    fax: +1 805 456 7998

    http://www.gluetools.com

  • Robert Monaghan

    October 10, 2011 at 5:13 pm

    The Flex already exports TC out the HD-SDI and optionally the TC Out Port.
    The HD-SDI Out is your best bet. I believe that this is on by default.

    In our Phantom Cine software, we will provide a QuickTime compatible TC track. In an upcoming release, this timecode track will match the Flex’s TC. (which you can capture via the HD-SDI port.)

    As for your workflow, you will need to test each step to see what works (or is available). I can’t guarantee that anyone’s workflow will work.. 🙂

    Bob.

    Robert Monaghan, CEO
    Glue Tools LLC
    POBox 24124
    Santa Barbara, CA, 93121
    United States

    tel: +1 805 456 7997
    fax: +1 805 456 7998

    http://www.gluetools.com

  • Robert Monaghan

    October 10, 2011 at 4:42 pm

    Hi,

    I generate a SMPTE TimeCode track using a system that I had developed. Basically it is generated from the time stamps from within the Cine itself. In the licensed version, this timecode track is always there. You don’t need to do anything.

    In a future release of my software (which should be soon) I will be creating a TimeCode track using the same mathematics that the Phantom Flex uses. So, if you set up your Flex to playback at 1080psf24, for instance, you will get a valid SMPTE timecode out of the TC port. This timecode will match the Timecode my software generates.

    I have extended this compatibility to other cameras, too, under some circumstances.

    In a nutshell:

    SMPTE Timecode is always there, in the licensed versions. If you are conforming in FCP, the TCs of a proxy rendered using my software, will match the Cine file.

    Proxies created from the Flex’s HD-SDI Out, will match a Cine played back in my software, in an upcoming update. (This week?)

    bob

    Robert Monaghan, CEO
    Glue Tools LLC
    POBox 24124
    Santa Barbara, CA, 93121
    United States

    tel: +1 805 456 7997
    fax: +1 805 456 7998

    http://www.gluetools.com

  • Robert Monaghan

    October 5, 2011 at 2:16 pm

    Hi Aysegul,

    If you use our GT Phantom Cine toolkit, you can use Compressor to convert the footage to DNxHD. You will also be able to have a timecode track converted, too.

    bob.

    Robert Monaghan, CEO
    Glue Tools LLC
    POBox 24124
    Santa Barbara, CA, 93121
    United States

    tel: +1 805 456 7997
    fax: +1 805 456 7998

    http://www.gluetools.com

  • Robert Monaghan

    July 20, 2011 at 2:12 pm

    Hi Yurii,

    Gamma is a way of adjusting an image, so that the image looks “right” in our brain. Computers (Cameras and scanners) all work best with a linear image. But when we look at a truly linear picture, it looks really dark to the human eye.

    This is because Mother Nature has crafted our eyes to work best in Daylight. As a result, the majority of our eye’s receptors are set up to process brightly lit parts of an image, but darker parts are “flat”. (we have a hard time resolving details that darkly lit). — interestingly, there is an assumption that there is no details in the darks, simply because our eyes can’t see it. (Nocturnal animals have a different “Gamma”. They can see dark details better than they can see “daylight” details.)

    So, what does this have to do with a Gamma Curve?

    The Gamma curve is often a power function that draws a “curve”. Google “Gamma Curve” to see a graph.
    When we take our gamma curve and apply it to the linear image, the lower 50% of the image’s brightness gets sharply contrasted, lifting/converting much of the darker pixel values into a broader range of low to mid tones. (for example, 18% grey – really dark in linear space, looks like it is actually 50% to our eyes.) The upper 50% of the image’s brightness looks really bright, even washed out in some cases.

    The resulting image looks “normal” to our eyes. Which is the main goal of a gamma curve.

    Ok, why work in linear space, then? Well, the problem is that Computer Image processing algorithms and electronics, etc. all work best in linear space. Everyone and their dog has their own Gamma Curve. It is impossible to write mathematics to cover every type of Gamma curve. So linear is the best way to do image operations. (There are a number of other reasons for Linear, too. BTW.)

    I hope this makes sense.

    bob.

    Robert Monaghan, CEO
    Glue Tools LLC
    POBox 24124
    Santa Barbara, CA, 93121
    United States

    tel: +1 805 456 7997
    fax: +1 805 456 7998

    http://www.gluetools.com

  • Robert Monaghan

    July 20, 2011 at 1:51 pm

    HI David,

    It looks as if you have my software installed. Can you do a “Get Info” on one of the DPX frames? It should show the Time Code and Reelname that is saved inside the DPX header. Hopefully it shows up.

    DPX files do not have a “standard” location for the Reelname. Companies such as ARRI came up with a defacto-standard for a location. Perhaps it is used in your footage.

    In order for a conform to work, you need to make a list of ProRes movies’ time code and reelnames, and have a corresponding time code and reelname in your DPX sequences. It is *far* easier if the frame rate, Time code stamps and reelnames all match. But often they do not.

    If you have ProRes movies that were generated from your DPX frames, you should have a matching Frame Rate, TC and Reelname. If only the frame rate matches, you can use Final Cut Pro to change the reelname and time code to match your DPX sequence. But this is a pain. Ultimately, there isn’t an automated process for this.

    If the ProRes movies match the DPX files, you can then export an EDL from FCP7, and send the DPX footage, along with your EDL to the Resolve. The Resolve should then pick up the pieces and run with it.

    Hopefully this should help.

    bob.

    Robert Monaghan, CEO
    Glue Tools LLC
    POBox 24124
    Santa Barbara, CA, 93121
    United States

    tel: +1 805 456 7997
    fax: +1 805 456 7998

    http://www.gluetools.com

Viewing 1 - 10 of 27 posts

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