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  • Tod Hopkins

    May 11, 2022 at 9:37 pm

    I doubt it’s the chip that is causing your specific problem. It sounds like playback buffer delay, which is likely software not hardware, and probably something specific to your project or sequence. Though I would check to see if any of your components have firmware or driver updates you should install. You should also start the process of elimination. Create a new project and new sequence. Throw some random stuff in, bit by bit until you see the problem. If it happens right away, probably system and not project or media. If it appears after you’ve added something specific, that may be your problem. If it doesn’t appear, it’s specific to your project or timeline. In the original project, try new sequences. Try dividing up your existing sequence or cutting and pasting portions into a new sequence. If it happens in some versions and not others, there’s something in the sequence causing the problem. Divide and conquer. Does it happen if you are fully rendered? Does it happen anywhere in the timeline or only in some places?

  • Tod Hopkins

    May 11, 2022 at 7:36 pm

    Yes, Playback Buffer Delay is definitely an Avid thing. Here’s a discussion of some possible reasons, including a mention of early Ryzen CPUs.

    https://community.avid.com/forums/t/198737.aspx

    Cheers, tod

  • Tod Hopkins

    May 11, 2022 at 6:01 pm

    Soundly appears to be designed to work as you describe so it seems unlikely that it is causing the problem, but I am not familiar.

  • Tod Hopkins

    May 11, 2022 at 4:40 pm

    Your audio may be the problem. This is out of left field, but I had similar problems caused by multi-channel source audio that the NLE (not Avid) found particularly difficult to handle, even when only the video track was included in the sequence without the audio. The fact that the original clips were very long also contributed. I solved the problem by converting the clips to standard stereo. There were only two active channels in the source so this was not a problem for the workflow.

    In short, never discount the possibility that the problem is your source audio. It happens.

  • Tod Hopkins

    March 15, 2022 at 5:53 pm

    Larry Jordan just released a good article specifically answering this question. It does not contradict the advice given here but is a much more detailed explanation of the whys, wherefores, and options to consider. https://larryjordan.com/articles/configure-a-new-mac-studio-for-video-editing/

  • Tod Hopkins

    March 11, 2022 at 3:58 pm

    Not necessarily. The speed difference between the internal and a fast external is not enough to outweigh using two drives. It is faster to pull from two drives than one drive. Asking your single system drive to do ALL the work is not ideal. Keeping projects and media on a separate storage device from your system drive is still the recommended practice.

  • Tod Hopkins

    March 10, 2022 at 4:27 pm

    The internal drive will be faster than any USB3 drive and most other externals. You need thunderbolt-connected NVMe or an array to get faster. That said, you should still separate your data from your system. Apps and caches on system, but projects and media on external drives. You want to spread the drive load, even on fast drives. I’d also advise the 1TB for space. Mac OS and its apps love to default to the system drive for everything. My system drive has 440GB and I avoid storing data on it and periodically clean it. My App folder alone is 90GB, and that’s just the apps, not all their associated support files, preferences, caches, and so on. If you want to play World of Warcraft (or anything like it) that’s easily 50GB by itself.

  • Tod Hopkins

    February 18, 2022 at 2:49 pm

    In the virtual world 24fps and 23.98fps are effectively the same thing. The distinction is an electronic one. In software, you are only changing the presumed playout rate against the real-world clock. You are only changing metadata, like changing between drop and non-drop. There are times when this presumption matters a lot in production, especially when synchronizing video with audio because audio relies on the clock, not frames, but when you drop a 24fps clip into a 23.98fps timeline, nothing changes except the presumed playout rate. If you are producing for television, your playout will be 23.98 (or 59.94 which is the same sync rate), and if you are producing for computers or theatrical, your playout will be 24fps, so if you want to know the actual length of your production, you want to work in the appropriate timeline.

  • Tod Hopkins

    February 7, 2022 at 3:07 pm

    Not unless there is a bug in the software, and I DO see references to such bugs, i.e. output setting not matching actual output for various versions of Premiere.

    I’d still consider other explanations. For instance, the encode “Profile” setting can limit bitrate settings. Premiere does not allow infinite variation. Changing some settings after setting the bitrate can cause Premiere to reset the bitrate. Also make sure you are comparing apples to apples. For example, the CBR setting may limit the entire bitstream, video and audio. (I’ve never checked this in Premiere). I’ve had high-bitrate, multi-channel audio foul my back-of-the-envelope calculations. Also mixing “Mbps” and “MBps” can throw you by a factor of 8. That’s smaller than what you are seeing, but could be part of the explanation.

    Also, “constant bitrate” is not always constant in the absolute sense. We think CBR means that if a frame does not need the full allocation to encode, it gets padded with empty bits up to the limit. In practice, it’s more complicated than that and resulting streams do actually vary from encoder to encoder. If your stream is very simple (lot’s of black or solid color for instance), it would not shock me if the resulting file was not 50mbps over the entire file. The encoder simply determined it did not need that allocation. The stream is still “constant” but the encoder used far fewer bits than you allocated.

  • Tod Hopkins

    January 24, 2022 at 2:37 pm

    Adjustment layers should trim normally. I would assume the problem is something unrelated. Locked track. Disabled clip. Sync lock. Nesting. Possibly the specific effect applied to the layer.

Viewing 1 - 10 of 83 posts

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