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  • bryson jones

    January 19, 2021 at 2:32 am

    imho and the opinion of Sony (for one example) for any ENG (not cinema) format, camera cards are an acquisition format, not an archival format. Rewrap (not transcode unless you want) out of XDCAM, P2, etc asap. There’s no good reason to keep the cards intact and many good ones to not. CatDV (and other software) can extract the metadata and keep it with the new rewrapped mp4, mxf, or mov files.

    As to cinema cards, this is one I can’t really comment on due to the fact that I’ve never been hired to work on them. But I will say, as you know, the major film archives are storing dpx sequences. Not sure if they are converting RED and similar to dpx for this (sources) but masters are done this way.

    I’m personally outraged that the camera companies made these formats with little to no thought given to the archiving of these cards and media. They dropped a huge issue into the laps of shooters and content owners and took the money and ran.

    I hope someone can manage to answer this in the next round of formats.

    As to the data model, in CatDV, for example, this is accomplished by recording the “card” as an object and then clips underneath it. This is a relatively simple relationship, but it works fine. I’d assume that this idea is as old as a reel of film that can contain several scenes and your archival friends will show you how this is done in “real” archives. (Post people never get to seriously archive at a level of say a film librarian or someone from one of the studios.) I’m teasing of course but as you know, when you get to the true high end of the business, post and archive are often separate departments and post is simply delivering to the archive team.

    Hope this helps and I hope smarter people than I post up as well!

  • bryson jones

    August 19, 2020 at 3:30 pm

    Everet,

    I’ll pitch in what I know and get some factory folks to add on what I miss.

    If you’re in the desktop app there are several options:

    You can delete the thumbs and recreate new ones.

    You can set a new “Poster Frame” which changes the default thumbnail.

    And you can set a marker which gives you a thumb per marker. (This will increase the size of your db of course.)

    There is also a new feature in Web3 called filmstrips (I believe) that makes a little hover and playback film of stills for a clip.

    Finally, via API you can inject thumbs for a clip in the server.

    Describe your use case a bit more and I’ll bet there’s a workable answer. Also, what continent are you on?

    bryson

    bryson “at” northshoreautomation.com

    northshoreautomation.com

  • bryson jones

    April 14, 2020 at 3:41 pm

    This is what North Shore refers to as a composite workflow. Which to us denotes that it’s made of component parts.

    Your ingest is a part, that’s already done. Then you can add other pieces to the workflow and either call them separately, by different metadata flags, or all at once by making versions that trigger the next.

    In this case I’m assuming you have a proxy status field that will trigger the creation of proxy.

    You could simply add another “analyze” step as a worker node action and trigger them separately, or set the analyze to trigger the pros creation after it runs which would give you a composite workflow which would allow you to trigger both, for assets that needed it. Or just trigger proxy on its own.

    Sounds like this would be a fast call to your integrator or you could play around in the worker and probably figure it out, depending on your time available.

    This “Analyze Later” has become a stock workflow for North Shore in the last few months due to the high volume of people who have bulk ingest jobs this year where they need to quickly ingest tens of thousands of assets.

    One caveat, we tend to only pull one to three thumbnails when ingesting large sets. This makes it faster and keeps the db size down. You can always go back and pull more thumbs later with the desktop client.

    Hope this helps.

    bryson

    bryson “at” northshoreautomation.com

    northshoreautomation.com

  • bryson jones

    April 1, 2020 at 2:54 pm

    Eric, I’d open a ticket with support on this. It might be a bug. I’ll see if someone can check this this am.

    bryson

    bryson “at” northshoreautomation.com

    northshoreautomation.com

  • bryson jones

    March 11, 2020 at 2:58 pm

    John, CatDV clients, like an NLE, have a dynamic concept of “online.”

    So if the system you open CatDV on doesn’t have those files mounted at the same location, they will correctly (for this system at this time) show as offline.

    If you want, you could tag files as “online at location x as of time x” but of course that requires you to trust that nothing happens to your storage.

    bryson

    bryson “at” northshoreautomation.com

    northshoreautomation.com

  • bryson jones

    January 24, 2020 at 4:19 pm

    This is not a field value. It’s just a way of showing the fact that you have a bunch if assets selected that have “various” values in that one field.

    Imagine if you selected records of all 50 state capitals. In the “state” field, you wouldn’t want to see all 50 states listed (which is what you have in that result) so instead CatDV let’s you know that there are “various” values in that field.

    If you selected only cities in New York, then the State field would only show “New York.”

    Hope that helps.

    bryson

    bryson “at” northshoreautomation.com

    northshoreautomation.com

  • bryson jones

    January 20, 2020 at 4:27 pm

    Hey Sam, great question.

    We tend to draw a distinction between organizing files on the file system vs clips in catalogs.

    Filtering can actually make organizing clips way faster after the fact in some cases. We often just drag a large messy folder in (turn off analysis or use Import Directory) and then you can filter and or analyze later. For example, if you know that your masters are all 1080 mp4 files and they are in folders named “exports” you can quickly find and filter to just those files and delete everything else, or drag those to a “masters” catalog.

    For file system cleanup, you can use the same idea, though that’s a bit more serious as far as potential consequences, so you will want to plan and discuss that a bit more.

    Know that we also make use of temporary catalogs where we are just cleaning things up and not intending to keep them. But be careful you leave your messy working catalogs in the system to put them in another Production Group (if you’re on a server based system) since you can get dupes temporarily in your dB during this process.

    But for sure, often we tell customers to not worry about getting things perfect as they can manage things much faster once they are in the DAM.

    I’d also love to hear what others have done.

    bryson

    bryson “at” northshoreautomation.com

    northshoreautomation.com

  • bryson jones

    July 20, 2018 at 3:22 pm

    Also, sorry, forgot to add that when/if you add that equivalent path it will make it so all assets on that original path in the future will also link correctly.

    bryson

    bryson “at” northshoreautomation.com

    northshoreautomation.com

  • bryson jones

    July 19, 2018 at 3:00 pm

    John,

    If the assets are all in the same relative path you can select all and then link the first one. The system will then link all other assets in that path. Then you can save the updates.

    It should also ask you if you want to create an “equivalent path” for that computer. In your case I would guess yes, since the computers seem like they will be used at the same time.

    Typically if you are moving assets on the same computer, we’d say “no”. So choose what suits your workflow best.

    bryson

    bryson “at” northshoreautomation.com

    northshoreautomation.com

  • bryson jones

    June 13, 2018 at 3:33 pm

    Josh, welcome to The asset management world.

    The short answer is… don’t do that.

    I use two terms, curating vs shoveling. DAM systems are typically made for curated collections. In fact, none of those big million dollar DAMs will let you just shovel stuff in. CatDV is so flexible and powerful that it will often allow you do do things that you might not want to, like dump all your temp files in quickly.

    Some may not agree, but I advise my clients to store core, important assets in CatDV. If not, at least split things up into catalogs. As the old adage goes, you can pay now or you can pay later. Make it fast and drag everything in and you’ll find a mess later, right?

    That said, you can do a lot of curation in CatDV if you want to quickly import a bunch of “mess” and then filter and remove those clips by a number of methods, before things are processed. You can filter with the quick filter, or using the tree in multiple ways. There are a lot of ways to make this fast.

    Really, it’s all about those hard words, workflow and process. Speak to your integrator (or hire one if you don’t have one or your install project is complete) and have them outline some workflows for you. The tool is great, but just like the difference between having Premiere and “being an editor”, you have to now apply some thought and technique.

    We are known for very extensive deployments. Those are mostly not about “installing CatDV” that takes very little time. The hard work is everything else; file naming, file system organization, ingest and management processes, automation, etc.

    Hope this helps you get started with the process.

    bryson

    bryson “at” northshoreautomation.com

    northshoreautomation.com

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