Forum Replies Created

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  • Adolfo Rozenfeld

    November 3, 2009 at 2:22 am

    Dave: AVC-Intra has “intra” in the name because it doesn’t use temporal compression like the other formats you mentioned. It uses an I-Frame only flavor of H264, as far as I know.
    Adobe will release soon an (announced) CS4.2 update for Premiere Pro that will add native support for AVC-Intra files. There are no announcements about After Effects in this regard.

    Adolfo Rozenfeld 路 Adobe

  • Adolfo Rozenfeld

    October 7, 2009 at 3:40 pm

    Premiere Pro can export MXF files, but I don’t think that would help much in this case. Neither Mocha nor Syntheyes can import P2 MXF files.

    Adolfo Rozenfeld 路 Adobe

  • Adolfo Rozenfeld

    September 14, 2009 at 11:04 pm

    How much RAM do you have? How many cores/CPUs?

    Adolfo Rozenfeld 路 Adobe

  • Adolfo Rozenfeld

    September 10, 2009 at 2:41 pm

    After Effects is not a 64 bit application on any platform.
    AE CS4 provides some of the benefits associated with 64 bits apps (also in the Mac OS), because of how the multiprocessing scheme allows to take advantage of far more than 4 GB of RAM by launching a rendering instance for each core or processor (each able to use up to 3.5 to 4 GB).

    I work for Adobe, so I don’t need to predict 馃檪 Unfortunately, I can’t tell you, since there are no announced plans about this. But, evidently, Adobe seems to be talking a lot about 64 bit, right?

    Finally, while there can be some rendering advantages for certain features in one or the other platform, I’d consider drastic differences (> 20 per cent) very, very rare.

    Adolfo Rozenfeld 路 Adobe

  • Adolfo Rozenfeld

    September 8, 2009 at 7:38 pm

    Making an element slide across two planes in 3D is not difficult. The hard part will be matching the perspective of the building in the original.
    So, one way to slide an AE 3D layer so that it looks like a texture wrapping when going through the juncture of the two planes could be like this:
    1. Create a very wide Comp (custome pixel dimensions).
    2. Add your layer inside that Comp.
    3. Nest this wide Comp in your main Comp (for example, drag it from the project panel to the main Comp’s timeline
    3. Duplicate the nested Comp in the main Comp’s timeline (when you duplicate a Comp in the timeline, the copy is a clone of the original and keeps in sync. When you duplicate in the project panel, it’s a separate instance).
    4. Enter the nested Comp, and animate the element in 2D from left to right.
    5. In the main Comp, crop both copies of the nested Comp with a rectangular mask, so that they overlap perfectly (the masks make the second comp begin where the other ends).
    6. Make both copies 3D.
    7. Move the anchor point of the second nested Comp (the one on the right) so that it’s aligned with the visible end on the left.
    8. Rotate the second Comp 90 degrees in the Y axis.
    That’s all.
    Matching the building’s perspective is a different subject 馃檪

    Adolfo Rozenfeld 路 Adobe

  • Adolfo Rozenfeld

    September 8, 2009 at 5:27 am

    No, the VP perspective planes themselves don’t get to AE for that kind of slide along surfaces. The Vanishing Point Exchange (VPE) workflow from PS to AE converts the whole scene into many 3D layers for AE. The idea is mostly to animate a camera around the scene.
    There’s more information on VPE in this AE Help page

    Adolfo Rozenfeld 路 Adobe

  • Adolfo Rozenfeld

    September 8, 2009 at 5:24 am

    There are no less than three ways, possible more.
    One is using the keyed layer as an Alpha Matte for another. This method requires that the “punching layer” sits immediately above in the timline from the “punched” layer. Then (if needed) press the Modes/Switches button at the bottom of the layer panel and you’ll get a column that reads “Trk Mat”. In that column set the mode for the lower layer to “Alpha Matte”. It will be punched by the layer above, which will be turned off.

    Second method: Apply the Set Matte effect (Effect > Channels > Set Matte) you want to be punched. You have a menu to choose which layer to use as a matte. Choose the keyed/alpha layer. The “Use for Matte” menu defaults to alpha, so you’re good to go. The advantage of the method is that it doesn’t require any specific order in the timeline for the layers you use.

    Last method: In the Modes panel, set the alpha/keyed layer to the “Stencil” blending mode. The advantage or drawback (depending on your needs) is that every layer located below that one in that timeline will only show through the alpha layer.

    Adolfo Rozenfeld 路 Adobe

  • Adolfo Rozenfeld

    September 8, 2009 at 4:45 am

    I assume you guys have all turned on the “Render Multiple Frames Simultaneously” checkbox in Preferences > Memory an multiprocessing, right?

    Adolfo Rozenfeld 路 Adobe

  • Adolfo Rozenfeld

    September 1, 2009 at 5:05 pm

    They will play fine on a LCD/plasma TV, because they are not really NTSC devices. They can bend the rules, sort of speak.
    They won’t play on an analog TV, and they can’t be used as that for broadcast. You would have to add pull-down (as Steve said) for that, so that extra frames are added to make it 29.97 fps.
    DVD players can take 24P assets and feed them like that to a (digital) TV. Or they can add pull-down on the fly (it’s a bit more complicated, but in practical terms it works like that), if you set them for an analog NTSC TV.

    Adolfo Rozenfeld 路 Adobe

  • Adolfo Rozenfeld

    August 31, 2009 at 6:50 pm

    Don’t worry. It’s only spambots which I am concerned with 馃檪
    I am downloading your file now. I am glad you found a workaround.

    Adolfo Rozenfeld 路 Adobe

Viewing 1 - 10 of 571 posts

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