Creative Communities of the World Forums

The peer to peer support community for media production professionals.

Forums Creative Community Conversations Randy Ubillos’ Antartica Video

  • Randy Ubillos’ Antartica Video

  • Chris Harlan

    January 18, 2012 at 7:30 pm

    By accident, I came across this charming video the other day:

    https://rickandrandy.com/travel/2011-12-26-Antarctica/ToAntarctica.html

    It is a short compilation of footage that Randy Ubillos and his partner Rick assembled on a December trip to Antarctica. You can see FCP X’s–I’m guessing it is X and not iMovie, though I can’t be sure–metadata organization principals at work, and get some sort of a notion of what the designer of X uses an NLE for. NOTE: It is a polished home movie, not a professional one, and my linking to it is not to suggest that X can’t be used for professional fare. I just think it is interesting to see what Randy U. does with video.

    I’ve also noticed that many of X’s supporters are also ardent photographers, as are Rick and Randy, and I wonder if there is something about the approach of X that is particularly appealing to photographers.

  • Andy Field

    January 18, 2012 at 8:31 pm

    Odd that the FCP Designer would post a “streaming” video that doesn’t stream (it appears to be a progressive download) I’m downloading to my desktop to review as the streaming doesn’t work well -kind of like FCP X

    Andy Field
    FieldVision Productions
    N. Bethesda, Maryland 20852

  • Adam White

    January 18, 2012 at 8:48 pm

    I noticed that, too. Couldn’t stream. Doesn’t fill you with confidence does it?

    But seriously, good point about photographers diggin’ the design of X. I’ve observed the same thing. They were far more at home with iMovie than FCP anyway, so there is nothing for them to dislike in X. Good luck to them – Im pretty sure it WILL be the tool of choice for photographers dabbling in video.

    For the rest of us terribly unfashionable old skool FCPers – probably not so much.

  • walter biscardi

    January 18, 2012 at 10:53 pm

    [Chris Harlan] “I’ve also noticed that many of X’s supporters are also ardent photographers, as are Rick and Randy, and I wonder if there is something about the approach of X that is particularly appealing to photographers.”

    The design of iMovie mirrors that of iPhoto which of course mirrors the design of FCP X. All of that on purpose so the end user can easily transition between the apps. Whether the app is “pro” or not all depends on the end user, not necessarily the app itself. I think Mark Raudonis says it best in his recent article, Apple is pursuing its path, it’s just not necessarily the path that his company or many others want to take as well.

    Walter Biscardi, Jr.
    Editor, Colorist, Director, Writer, Consultant, Author, Chef.
    HD Post and Production
    Biscardi Creative Media

    “This American Land” – our new PBS Series.

    Blog Twitter Facebook

  • Aindreas Gallagher

    January 19, 2012 at 1:51 am

    the essential apple statement is taste: that they are their own weather vane?
    Jobs said it for years – we make the stuff we would want to use.
    ipod, iphone, ipad – god knows that was thunder and lightning.

    but as an insular credo applied to the complexities of professional craft? it is a mess.

    Colour coded Roles? Really? What?

    Why stop there? Ye have only begun to remake editing in your own vision.
    what’s next? Spines? Red light GUI T-junctions for non-intersecting vertically connected edits?

    Apple have only begun to re-make editing in their image.

    FCPX is not a professional application, simply because it came out of a very weird room with five guys in it who never edited – and it is loaded with ridiculous metaphors that have no broader context or meaning.

    And its colour corrector is square.

    FCPX is a dead, internal, Apple vanity project.

    http://www.ogallchoir.net
    promo producer/editor.grading/motion graphics

  • Gerry Fraiberg

    January 19, 2012 at 2:43 am

    It would appear that this Antarctica Video was edited in iMovie, based on the opening graphics which are part of the iMovie package – not FCP X.

  • John-Michael Seng-Wheeler

    January 19, 2012 at 3:22 am

    Can someone who’s used the stabilizer feature in FCPX/ iMovie, (which ever this was edited in) tell me if that is what’s causing the rippling in some of the shots?

    It seems like what I see in this video was exactly what I would expect a tool called “Warp stabilizer” to do: Move the center of the image with respect to the edges, squishing and expanding the outer edges of the image to couter camera shake.

    Anyway, if that’s what it is, it made the video almost unwatchable for me, seeing the edges of the image gyrate like that. I had to rest my eyes after watching the video it messed with them so bad.

  • Chris Harlan

    January 19, 2012 at 3:33 am

    [Gerry Fraiberg] “It would appear that this Antarctica Video was edited in iMovie, based on the opening graphics which are part of the iMovie package – not FCP X.”

    Well, isn’t that interesting. I’d a thunk he’d a wanted to play with FCP X.

  • Jeremy Garchow

    January 19, 2012 at 4:03 am

    [John-Michael Seng-Wheeler] “Anyway, if that’s what it is, it made the video almost unwatchable for me, seeing the edges of the image gyrate like that. I had to rest my eyes after watching the video it messed with them so bad.”

    I, too, don’t think this was fcpx. Of course, I could be wrong. I have seen that opening template before (I wish I could remember where), and they were iMovie edits.

    That gyration looks like a camera with rolling shutter/jello cam.

    I have no idea if iMovie has any fixes for it, but it doesn’t look like it does a good job.

    I haven’t tried rolling shutter repair in fcpx, but the optical flow has produced some pretty incredible results (https://vimeo.com/25894146)

    Some contents or functionalities here are not available due to your cookie preferences!

    This happens because the functionality/content marked as “Vimeo framework” uses cookies that you choosed to keep disabled. In order to view this content or use this functionality, please enable cookies: click here to open your cookie preferences.

  • John-Michael Seng-Wheeler

    January 19, 2012 at 4:10 am

    What ever it is, I’ve never seen it before. I started working with pro ENG cameras before CMOS sensors became common, so my experience with rolling shutter is non existent.
    Until about a month ago when I picked out a Canon Vixia for my father, who borrowed one from a friend to film a class, and loved it so much he wanted his own, I’d only ever used CCD cameras.

Viewing 1 - 10 of 25 posts

Log in to reply.

We use anonymous cookies to give you the best experience we can.
Our Privacy policy | GDPR Policy