Forum Replies Created

Viewing 1 - 10 of 61 posts
  • Michael Lorushe

    August 23, 2011 at 3:47 pm

    Thanks guys.

  • Michael Lorushe

    July 21, 2011 at 9:40 pm

    Rob,

    If it were me, I wouldn’t use H.264 or a quicktime format to embed on the web for people to see. Not everyone may be able to watch it in that format, especially PC users. You could export from your editing software as a flash file (.flv)…and use a program like dreamweaver to generate a skin. If that’s too complicated you could just sign up for a vimeo+ account, upload your videos their and embed them onto your website. You can customize the skin to remove the vimeo logo, like button, share button etc. so that clients wont know its actually embed, thats what I do, very convenient.

    Mike

    Michael Lorushe – Freelance Filmmaker
    http://www.mikedoesmedia.com
    http://www.hitchstudios.co.uk

  • Michael Lorushe

    July 21, 2011 at 9:17 pm

    I’d have to agree with Mark. It’s annoying and happens to me from time to time but definitely NOT worth taking any further, Just get a 50% non-refundable deposit upfront next time and you’ll greatly reduce the chances of this type of thing happening.

    Michael Lorushe – Freelance Filmmaker
    http://www.mikedoesmedia.com
    http://www.hitchstudios.co.uk

  • Michael Lorushe

    June 11, 2011 at 12:04 pm

    I’m no audio expert but have you considered using a separate audio recorder like the zoom H1? I did previously use wireless lav mics for weddings but recently switched to using the H1…the quality is superior and the issue of interference is eliminated. The only thing is, you can’t monitor the audio while filming.

    Michael Folorunsho – Freelance Filmmaker
    http://www.mikedoesmedia.com
    http://www.hitchstudios.co.uk

  • Michael Lorushe

    June 8, 2011 at 4:28 am

    Yep i agree with you. I never understood the whole ‘shoot as much footage as possible’ idea that many videographers seem to have. I usually know exactly how i’m going to edit so i only shoot what i think is I’ll use.

    The one thing i would add is, make sure your client understands that your not actually going to shoot every second of the whole event. You’d think that’s obvious but you’d be surprised.

    Michael Folorunsho – Freelance Filmmaker
    http://www.mikedoesmedia.com
    http://www.hitchstudios.co.uk

  • Michael Lorushe

    May 19, 2011 at 3:22 pm

    Thanks for your reply Noah. What other brand(s) would you recommend?

    Michael Folorunsho – Videographer & Editor
    http://www.mikedoesmedia.com

  • Michael Lorushe

    January 31, 2011 at 8:52 pm

    You’re *

    Michael Folorunsho – Videographer & Editor
    http://www.mikedoesmedia.com

  • Michael Lorushe

    January 31, 2011 at 8:51 pm

    Thanks Vince!

    Your a life saver!

    Michael Folorunsho – Videographer & Editor
    http://www.mikedoesmedia.com

  • Michael Lorushe

    January 31, 2011 at 8:28 pm

    Hi Vince,

    Thanks for the clarification on that.

    The crop setting however is grayed out so I can’t change it. Is there any other work around? I really need those bars not to be there.

    Mike

    Michael Folorunsho – Videographer & Editor
    http://www.mikedoesmedia.com

  • Michael Lorushe

    January 9, 2011 at 8:34 pm

    Hi Roz,

    I wouldn’t bother with a DOF adapter. They eat up light, add to your set up time and make your camera front-end heavy. You’d be better off getting a T2i for the money you’d spend on a DOF adapter.

    The Canon DSLRs all produce beautiful images, probably better than the A1. However, a few factors you should consider:

    AUDIO – Canon DSLRs capture crappy audio. You can control the levels with the 60d but with no headphone jack, you can’t monitor the sound the camera is capturing. There are no XLR inputs. So if you care about the quality of audio on your productions, you’ll have to invest in an external device. I use a Zoom H4n. Look it up.

    LENSES – You’ll need fast lenses, probably covering a variety of focal lengths. At the very least you want to start at f/2.8 lenses with some sort of IS (image stabilization). You’ll have to decide whether you want the flexibility of using zoom lenses or the better optical quality of primes. Your needs will depend on what you’ll be shooting.

    WORKFLOW – DV/HDV tapes still have their place. Real time capturing is long and kinda annoying but remember that tapes are super cheap and you have a hard, physical backup of your video. Flash cards are cool, but you’ll have to invest more and more into external hard drives to back up all your stuff over time.
    Editing can also be a pain. The H.264 video format the DSLRs record in are not edit friendly so you’ll probably have to convert it into a another format before you can edit it. Having said that, Premiere CS5 can edit H.264 natively. Depends on what you use to edit.

    That’s just some stuff you should consider. I haven’t even mentioned the overheating issues, aliasing issues and the lack of dynamic range.

    All in all, the Canon DSLRs do produce great video, Just don’t overlook the cons of the them as I did. Get a 60d if you can afford it but DON’T ditch your A1 just yet. Remember that these DSLRs are STILLS cameras that happen to shoot awesome video. Your A1 is a professional video camera with lots of professional video camera features and controls.

    Good luck!

    Michael Folorunsho – Videographer & Editor
    http://www.mikedoesmedia.com

Viewing 1 - 10 of 61 posts

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