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  • Jeff Pulera

    February 3, 2020 at 8:32 pm

    Strongly suggested to convert any variable frame rate clips to constant frame rate before you import or edit in Premiere. The free Handbrake app does a good job. Be sure to set 29.97 and Constant Frame Rate in export settings before encoding new clip.

    Perhaps once the clips are recreated with constant frame rate, will sync better with audio?

    Thanks

    Jeff Pulera
    Safe Harbor Computers

  • Jeff Pulera

    December 30, 2019 at 4:42 pm

    With certain file formats, things just work better in general when using Media Browser to import. Something to do with the way Premiere see/interprets the footage. I think Media Browser is looking at the bigger context of metadata/folder structure and all of that, versus “Import” simply grabbing the one clip as a stand-alone media file.

    Some cameras record sound and video to separate files. Media Browser puts them back together.

    Many cameras break long recordings, like over 20 minutes or so, into separate chunks called spanned files. I’ve done 2-3 hour stage events without stopping recording, and the AVCHD video on SD card (.mts files) is in several pieces of 4GB each for example. If you “import” all the pieces and assemble to timeline, you may have brief video and/or audio glitches/missing frames at the joints. If you use Media Browser it understands that the multiple clips are part of a single, longer recording and when brought in it will appear as one long clip, no breaks!

    Just in general, you are much better off to use Media Browser when dealing with media from cards. If you just have a single video clip not from a card, like an .avi or .mov or .mp4, then sure go ahead and use FILE > IMPORT, that’s fine. When dealing with card media, stick with Media Browser for best results.

    Thanks

    Jeff Pulera
    Safe Harbor Computers

  • Jeff Pulera

    December 27, 2019 at 3:55 pm

    Workflow tip that may help, if not already doing so:

    • Create NEW folder on hard drive for each SD card you need to import
    • Copy ENTIRE contents of 1 SD card to 1 folder. Copy ALL files/folders, not just video clips
    • In Premiere, import using Media Browser, not File > Import

    Jeff Pulera
    Safe Harbor Computers

  • Jeff Pulera

    December 24, 2019 at 5:52 pm

    No that doesn’t make any sense at all. What is the format of the clips, and what are you exporting to? Any effects applied?

    If you could please share a screen shot of the Export Settings panel, that can often be very helpful in spotting potential issues, and fixes.

    Thank you

    Jeff Pulera
    Safe Harbor Computers

  • Jeff Pulera

    November 21, 2019 at 4:54 pm

    Quite simply, you could have a bad batch of blank media, or your burner is going bad (new one is like $40).

    Those are a few things to check. Really no reason that the software should start introducing random glitches, I would look at the actual burning process.

    I also like to create an .iso and then burn using that for consistency. I burn one disc and test thoroughly and if good, then burn all discs from same known-good .iso file. If any issues then, must be media or burner.

    Thanks

    Jeff Pulera
    Safe Harbor Computers

  • Jeff Pulera

    November 20, 2019 at 6:55 pm

    The methods used to copy and import media can sometimes affect things. When copying SD cards to hard drive, create a NEW FOLDER for each card, and copy entire contents of that card to the new folder. Do not pick and choose video clips, copy everything as found on SD card. Then in Premiere, use Media Browser to do the actual importing (rather than File > Import).

    Many cameras include metadata in the folders that can be beneficial to the NLE in many ways to help it “understand” or interpret exactly what it’s working with. Just makes everything go smoother to keep that metadata and folder structure intact.

    Also, make sure that the Sequence Settings match the clips. If the frame rate is different, that can sometimes cause issues. And Premiere does not like .mp3 files, so if you have any, convert to .wav before using in Premiere, like with Audition for instance.

    Thanks

    Jeff Pulera
    Safe Harbor Computers

  • Jeff Pulera

    November 20, 2019 at 3:27 pm

    Hi Casey,

    How are you determining that the audio is out of sync? Meaning what is the workflow used to MONITOR the video and audio? Is this using speakers connected to computer, and watching on computer screen, or external HDMI display perhaps?

    And what if you do not adjust the audio in sequence, and just Export – is it also then out of sync on exported clip?

    If you watch your RAW clips in another player like VLC, is audio in sync there?

    Thanks

    Jeff Pulera
    Safe Harbor Computers

  • Jeff Pulera

    November 19, 2019 at 3:46 pm

    Hi Rick,

    Will this be a single-layer DVD – 4.7GB?

    150 minutes is a lot to fit, will have to reduce the quality using something like 3.6 data rate. Might be fine for some material like a talking head video, while videos with lots of motion would suffer. All depends on content.

    Start with the MPEG-2 DVD preset. Definitely use 2-Pass VBR encoding, something like 2.0 min, 6.0 max, with the 3.6 Target/AVG

    For audio, you can leave the default PCM audio which generates a .wav file. When you bring the .wav into Encore, it will by default convert to Dolby which is a far smaller file on the DVD.

    Do not use motion menus, they will take up space on the DVD that you don’t have available

    Thanks

    Jeff Pulera
    Safe Harbor Computers

  • Jeff Pulera

    October 31, 2019 at 1:55 pm

    Hi Mark,

    When you have all the clips imported into Project Bin, multi-select all of them at once, then right-click and go into Modify > Interpret > Audio and you should be able to change them all together in one shot.

    Depending on your needs, you might also just use Fill Left or Fill Right in the timeline. Say I have a shotgun mic and a wireless mic on camera, on L and R channels, for a wedding ceremony. I’ll only need the R channel briefly for the vows, using the shotgun the rest of the time. I can apply Fill Right With Left effect for most clips (again, using multi-select) and then use Fill Left With Right just for the vows clip. Thereby retaining the stereo settings throughout production and both channels are filled when exporting stereo.

    Thanks

    Jeff Pulera
    Safe Harbor Computers

  • Jeff Pulera

    October 28, 2019 at 9:31 pm

    If you want to try something you read online…TEST that workflow first, don’t “try” it on a paying job.

    I have no idea why 120p would be recommended. I can see shooting at 60p, but 120p? The only reason to shoot anything at 120p would be if you planned to do a lot of slow motion with the footage.

    We don’t know what exactly the footage format is, what hardware you have in the computer, what if any effects might be applied to the footage, what format you are exporting to and what are the export settings. So many factors that can affect the render time.

    Please provide as much info as possible including a screen grab of the Export Settings window

    Thanks

    Jeff

    Jeff Pulera
    Safe Harbor Computers

Viewing 1 - 10 of 2,554 posts

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