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Forums VEGAS Pro Ultimate Vegas Machine?

  • Ultimate Vegas Machine?

     Matthew Jeschke updated 3 weeks ago 10 Members · 70 Posts
  • Ole Kristiansen

    December 24, 2016 at 8:25 am

    “It was my nasty Samsung S6 footage that dropped frames on timeline playback.”

    I think it’s because your Samsung S6 recorder with variable framte rates !

    best,
    Ole

  • James Redmond

    December 27, 2016 at 10:18 pm

    Aaron, Thanks again for all your valuable information. Sorry it’s taken a while to respond with the holidays plus I decided to do a clean install of Windows 10 Pro and it is taking me a while to get everything back and working. I’m almost there.

    After reading these series of posts about using dual graphics cards, what I understood was to have one inexpensive card for display and other powerful card for rendering. In the earlier posts I thought your had recommended the FirePro series. When I had the 480 and the 5100 installed I could not get Vegas to use the FirePro 5100. That is when I called AMD tech support and they said to have both graphics card exactly the same. It had to do with the drivers. So I went with two 480.

    I am very happy with the setup and the speed. I have the 6950x i7 processor with 32 megs of ram. I have a documentary that I’ve been working for the past several years that is 90 minutes long. About three weeks ago I rendered it and it took about 6 hours. With my new setup it took about 90 minutes! Which is great for me.

    Thanks again for your support. Happy New Year, James

    James Redmond
    Dynamic Videos, Inc.
    Rogers, AR USA

  • Dave Haynie

    January 10, 2017 at 4:47 am

    [James Redmond] “After reading these series of posts about using dual graphics cards, what I understood was to have one inexpensive card for display and other powerful card for rendering. In the earlier posts I thought your had recommended the FirePro series. When I had the 480 and the 5100 installed I could not get Vegas to use the FirePro 5100. That is when I called AMD tech support and they said to have both graphics card exactly the same. It had to do with the drivers. So I went with two 480.”

    That’s probably a better rig anyway.

    The “professional” cards are not well understood by most people, but they’re generally slower to much slower than same-year “standard” cards. And that’s from either AMD or nVidia.

    Basically, the pro cards are made from older chips. When AMD or nVidia make a new chip, it’s only possible when they can sell the thing in the millions. They don’t sell millions of pro-model GPUs for these FirePro or Quadro cards. But they do sell stability. So the drivers for any Pro card get a year or two of regular updates, and meanwhile, they’re looking at the chip, maybe making a tweak to fix a bug, probably enabling some extra memory, but that’s about it. So these hit the pro market with drivers that are very solid.

    Sometimes there are artificial restrictions on the standard cards. For example, nVidia has a few 64-bit OpenGL functions that run really slow on their standard cards compared to the pro cards. However, a few intrepid comedian-hackers out there re-coded those operations in CUDA for consumer cards, and they basically matched the pro versions. So it’s a software/driver handicap. But nothing that seems to ever affect video use.

    In the past, you might have had some advantage in the extra memory on a pro card. But there’s been such a push for larger memories on standard cards, to support multi-monitor and 4K gaming and that sort of thing. I looked at the latest when buying my upgrade last fall, and concluded that the RX480 was the best deal going. I could pay twice as much for a FirePro and get lower performance.

    One other advantage of the pro cards — they’re usually in a single-slot form factor. If I really wanted four GPUs in my system, that would become an issue. That’s the kind of thing some serious OpenGL users are looking for, like film animators, mechanical CAD people (I work with one of those guys… he’s got a 64″ 4K monitor on his desk at the office).

    Once example of this: I have a nVidia Quadro 4000 in my office PC… something the mechanical guys were pushing on me when I started there in 2012. A few years ago, I was playing around with digital currency and the experimental “ARS Coins” done on ARS Technica. I had set up my home system, with my 6 core i7-3930K and my Radeon HD6900.. that was cranking out some real coins. So I set up the same render at the office using the 4-core i7 and the nVidia… yawn. Not so good. Then I decided to try the AMD A6 (forget the version) in the tiny 1U rackmount PC I built as basically just a audio recorder. It was actually outperfoming the stand-alone performance of my 6-core i7, and it was just edging out the Quadro 4000. You could buy over a half-dozen of those A6 systems for the price of the nVidia! Sure, not a terribly fair thing, and I don’t use either the music PC or the office PC for video, so there’s no actual Vegas test there.

    -Dave

  • Matthew Jeschke

    January 10, 2017 at 5:40 pm

    Very helpful info none the less. Thanks for sharing your experience with the RX480.

    I had similar thoughts… I guess with a little time the future will tell as software and drivers better support the newer hardware. It was very trippy though seeing less equipped boarders selling for much more. The machine renders video like a beast. It renders faster than the length of it’s timeline in many circumstances. Sometimes full quality timeline playback is a little glitchy though. I always watch these studios playback their timelines in Youtube tutorials and think… “am I the only one that cannot playback a timeline without dropping frames?” They must have $10,000 editing machines LOL

    On the note of single card width graphics cards… My friend built a BUNCH of bitcoin machines. He bought some adapter and was able to plug in a BUNCH of graphics cards. They didn’t plug into the motherboard. The adapter broke them out and they plugged in to a chasis he built. It was pretty cool.

    He preferred the 290x… but this was a couple years ago. Then bitcoin crashed. I had bought my older 7800 card from him. He had a 290x which I should have bought but the 7800 seemed to reder video quite well at the time I bought it.

    Thanks for sharing the post. I think this will be valuable for future people interested in building a Vegas Pro Machine. There was VERY little info of ANY help online.

    ————————————–

    I do Architectural Photograph & Cinematography as a part of being a Residential Real Estate Consultant.

    Some of my work can be seen at,
    https://www.youtube.com/keystoaz/
    https://www.vimeo.com/matthewjeschke/

    Home

    PS. It\’s an excellent excuse to ride off what I love, Camera equipment 🙂

  • Matthew Jeschke

    July 31, 2018 at 5:49 pm

    James, you’ve got me thinking of this post again ☺ I came back to re-read it. Getting annoyed in that, I cannot edit h.265 timeline is completely glitchy. I’d have to use proxy files. Also if I add any amount of plugins the timeline crashes.

    I’m not sure what my bottleneck is, the graphics cards or the processor. I have 64gb RAM. Fastest drives possible for the day, speed test prior in the this post.

    My graphics card is a Radeon RX480 w/ 8gb ram.
    My processor is an intel i7-5930k 3.5GHRZ 6cores

    I’d been looking at i7 extreme processor 10 core setup. However, that kind of money is a little ridiculous if I’m not sure it solves the problem. I’m amazed to see this hardware hasn’t dropped in price, the graphics card actually went up in price.

    I contacted Magics the new owners of Vegas Pro. They’d not supply me any specs on what works / what their software developers use to test the software on. I was rather annoyed. Obviously my $4,000 machine isn’t strong enough but far surpasses their minimum specs. They keep pushing for upgrade to SV15 but I’m reluctant if I have the same issues there.

    Any further information on what works best for SVP?

    ————————————–

    I do Architectural Photograph & Cinematography as a part of being a Residential Real Estate Consultant.

    Some of my work can be seen at,
    https://www.youtube.com/keystoaz/
    https://www.vimeo.com/matthewjeschke/

    Home

    PS. It\’s an excellent excuse to ride off what I love, Camera equipment 🙂

  • Aaron Star

    August 1, 2018 at 3:50 am

    Back in the day when H.264 was as new as h.265 is now, most machines and NLEs struggled with it. Here is what I understand, and maybe the suggestions will help. I have not tried them myself.

    Vegas 11-14 pretty much required the best OpenCL capable GPU, at that time it was AMD series. If you are using Vegas 14 or less, you should be building for optimal cards for that era. Effects that required the higher math that OpenCL provided saw great acceleration when compared to CPU only. A great number or people I believe had heat and other problems with their machines, which made the GPU acceleration unstable. I found GPU acceleration unstable until I figured out what was causing it.

    The coders working on Vegas 11-14, made no effort to support things like VCE built into the AMD GPU. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_Coding_Engine

    With Vegas 15+ the new coders integrated NVIDIA support for NVENC, while also seemingly supporting OpenCL for the higher math capabilities. Formats that are compatible with NVENC will see an acceleration with decode and encode. Effects that require OpenCL for the higher math will be limited on how well NV GPUs support the OpenCL standard. I think NV has improved their support of OpenCL, so with the newest cards there might not be such a wide gap as there once was.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nvidia_NVENC – Make sure to read through the generation differences and understand how they may factor into your workflow. For example if you are trying to do 4K HDR material, then a Generation 1 NVENC card will not be utilized. HEVC or H.265 is not supported until generation 3 and above.

    Since Vegas has no “compatibility applet” or capabilities function tests built in, you are on your own to make sure your system supports the software features that Vegas claims to support.

    Make sure to test your configuration for support of the different standards. Also periodically check for memory errors, heat issues, and DPC latency issues that might come up over time with other software installs or dirt build up.

    If you are going to try 2 GPUS in your system, make sure the motherboard will supply 2 16X lanes of bandwidth. Most cheap, non workstation motherboards only support one 16x card in the system.

    Hopefully that make sense to someone out there.

  • Matthew Jeschke

    August 1, 2018 at 7:32 pm

    That makes since. Maybe there is some hope that SVP15 will have better hardware support? You’re absolutely right my days as an engineer, most of the systems in hardware go unused it takes a very long time for software to catch up. Sometimes they never do… and hardware never gets taken full advantage of.

    I get the impression Adobe is a bit better at this than Vegas? I just don’t like the idea of subscription although I’ve probably paid more to vegas in upgrades.

    ————————————–

    I do Architectural Photograph & Cinematography as a part of being a Residential Real Estate Consultant.

    Some of my work can be seen at,
    https://www.youtube.com/keystoaz/
    https://www.vimeo.com/matthewjeschke/

    Home

    PS. It\’s an excellent excuse to ride off what I love, Camera equipment 🙂

  • Philippe Gaudens

    August 3, 2018 at 10:26 am

    Hello,

    I moved from Vegas 13, to 14, to 15 (awaiting for 16), and I can tell you that MAGIX really improved the Vegas 15 engine !!
    On the exactly same computer, real time play is far smoother ! Almost no more glitches…

    They optimized the engine that now better use compute ressources from CPU and GPU…

    I have bi-Xeon 12 cores (24 cores, 48 threads) and Vegas 14 was glitchy playing 1080p with just blur transitions or simple moving titles… I had to select “Preview half” to get things better… Sometimes I had to select Draft half !

    With Vegas 15 I always select Best Full and it is smoother than ever! Not totally smooth, but far enough to preview.

    Previous versions until Vegas 14 was limited to 16 rendering threads…

    Vegas 15 handles all my CPU threads:

    And I guess MAGIX also optimized the use of GPU ressources in Vegas… During realtime playing, My GPU load is about 25%… While previous versions was less than 10%

    But I noticed that my CPU cores are pretty much loaded when I render… But real time playing with just transitions make the CPU load focused on 1 core, and a little bit on others…
    I would say you’d better choose a CPU with high frequency (4Ghz) instead of chossing more cores…
    It depends on what is the most important to you… Editing, or rendering ?

    Best regards,
    Philippe.

  • Matthew Jeschke

    August 3, 2018 at 4:35 pm

    super helpful. Many thanks. I am interested in using the h.265 capabilities of my drones, and other cameras when they support that. You have a beast of a machine! Wow, wish I had money for those processors ☺

    I may have to jump to the vegas 15 do you have any clue when they plan to release 16? I’d imagine pretty soon no?

    ————————————–

    I do Architectural Photograph & Cinematography as a part of being a Residential Real Estate Consultant.

    Some of my work can be seen at,
    https://www.youtube.com/keystoaz/
    https://www.vimeo.com/matthewjeschke/

    Home

    PS. It\’s an excellent excuse to ride off what I love, Camera equipment 🙂

  • Matthew Jeschke

    April 25, 2021 at 6:07 pm

    Thought I would post an update here. The build has gotten faster and faster as Magix implements more of the hardware support in their software. I’m now running Vegas Pro 18.

    I also noticed some of the hardware is getting less expensive. I was able to update from an I7-5930k (6 core) to a i7-6850k (10 core). Was a bit worried as the new processor is slower frequency. However, it dramatically sped up render times.

    I took a timeline and rendered it with both processors. The 10 core processor was 42% faster! Timeline playback appears to be comparable.

    The only remaining upgrade to max out my system is a second graphics card. Unfortunately, with digital currency on the rise I’ve been unable to secure one at a reasonable price. However, that said, the CPU still seems to be a the main limiting factor. All 20 processors (10 cores) were mostly maxed out during the render.

    With luck, Magix will implement more of the GPU functionality in their future releases decreasing CPU load.

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