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  • Smarter and Faster

  • Oliver Peters

    May 2, 2018 at 1:03 pm

    Steve Martin’s Working Smarter and Faster presentation from NAB

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=MdqTwAPg6Qg

    – Oliver

    Oliver Peters – oliverpeters.com

  • Bill Davis

    May 2, 2018 at 9:12 pm

    Steves typical excellent work.

    For editors not accustomed to in the FCP X editorial scheme, this will be a nice window into why editors new to X get so frustrated when it doesn’t work like they expect an NLE to operate.

    The timeline assembly logic is there – but it’s often simply not the timeline assembly logic they are accustomed to.

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    The shortest path to FCP X mastery.

  • David Mathis

    May 3, 2018 at 3:32 pm

    Just watched it yesterday and excellent work as always. The timeline is by far the biggest challenge when coming over from a traditional NLE with tracks like FCP Dinosaur, I mean old school.

  • Simon Ubsdell

    May 3, 2018 at 7:35 pm

    Steve is a brilliant educator (and a lovely guy!) and he’s at the top of his game again here.

    However, one thing struck me about this presentation.

    While he does a good job of explaining the wrinkles of editing in FCP X, he doesn’t actually make the case for editing “faster”.

    What he does show is that you need to understand the ways in which FCP X is different in order not to stumble over it – and actually make things slower! But that’s not really the same thing at all.

    For example, the one frame gap clip to make sure you don’t lose your music when you delete your first clip is actually a workaround that tries to fool the default behaviour of the timeline – this is not a problem you face in conventional NLEs, it’s just one of the things you have to live with in FCP X. But it’s not a “feature” to get excited about – its a limitation that you have to know about!

    Similarly with the tilde key thing for over-riding clip connections when slipping – in a conventional NLE this is not something you have to worry about so you can hardly claim it as a plus point that makes FCP X “faster”.

    And the technique of editing with gap clips is well explained, but I have never found this to be much of a timesaver – and it’s mostly not unique to FCP X to be able to edit using gaps. You have to use gaps clips in FCP X because you’re missing other ways of doing the same thing. That’s not a bonus.

    The roles bussing thing is actually a very poor workaround for what track based NLEs do much better. It would be a great deal less problematic if they could find a way to do away with the necessity of compounding in order to access this functionality, but it still wouldn’t be as versatile as traditional bussing.

    I think a lot of people think of the peculiarities of FCP X as special features to get excited about, when the reality is that they’re just different solutions to problems that other NLEs approach in other ways. You might personally prefer them, but they’re often not objectively “better”.

    So what Steve is really showing here is how to edit smarter and faster with FCP X and avoid it slowing you down. What he’s not really showing is that FCP X is a faster way of working. That’s not to say that the case can’t be made, but it isn’t being made in this video.

    Simon Ubsdell
    tokyo productions
    hawaiki

  • Tony West

    May 3, 2018 at 8:33 pm

    [Simon Ubsdell] “For example, the one frame gap clip to make sure you don’t lose your music when you delete your first clip is actually a workaround that tries to fool the default behaviour of the timeline – this is not a problem you face in conventional NLEs, it’s just one of the things you have to live with in FCP X. But it’s not a “feature” to get excited about – its a limitation that you have to know about!”

    He didn’t really have to make that one frame gap clip though. He could have held down the tilde key while hitting delete or if he wanted to keep the position, then just be in the position tool and then do the same thing. Either way that music would stay : )

  • Simon Ubsdell

    May 3, 2018 at 8:54 pm

    [Tony West] “He didn’t really have to make that one frame gap clip though. He could have held down the tilde key while hitting delete or if he wanted to keep the position, then just be in the position tool and then do the same thing. Either way that music would stay : )”

    No, indeed. You’re absolutely right.*

    But that doesn’t change anything about the point I was making which was that he’s not showing how FCP X is “Smarter and Faster”, he’s only showing how you don’t have to let it slow you down unnecessarily.

    That’s not at all the same thing.

    * Every NLE has workarounds that you need to just accept.

    Simon Ubsdell
    tokyo productions
    hawaiki

  • greg janza

    May 3, 2018 at 8:59 pm

    Cue Bill’s FCPX glorifying rebuttal in 3,2,1…

    One aspect that doesn’t get mentioned in all of this nonsense about why FCPX lacks real traction after seven years is that basic human nature is fighting against it.

    Most people want the path of least resistance. When prompted with the option of learning a whole new approach to editing I’m going to guess that 9 out of 10 folks will pass.

    I learned it out of necessity to take a FCPX gig and had the gig not come along there’s little chance that I would’ve taken the time to learn it.

    Life is busy. Work schedules are demanding and so voluntarily taking even more time away from those activities that people actually like to do is not exactly a great selling point even if it’s heavily advertised to speed up your workflow.

    Another thing that did get mentioned in the other thread is the perception that the software is a cheap pile of garbage that’s on the same level as imovie. This of course isn’t the case but whenever I bring up the subject of FCPX with other editors, that’s the response that I get.

    The “cheap” moniker that’s been attached to the product also seems to be a limiting factor in it’s overall adoption.

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  • Simon Ubsdell

    May 3, 2018 at 9:08 pm

    [greg janza] “Most people want the path of least resistance. When prompted with the option of learning a whole new approach to editing I’m going to guess that 9 out of 10 folks will pass.”

    I think you have allowed Bill to mess with your head here.* FCP X is really, really, really not difficult to master – and master in depth.

    The editors I know (most of them) are very clever people and have no difficulty accommodating themselves to new ways of working. (Maybe that’s not the case in other territories but it’s certainly true here.) You just have to convince them that the change is worth the effort … and more importantly the disruption, given that their workflows are dependent on a large number of interactions with other workflows and other applications.

    If you can make an adequate case – and bear in mind that they are a very discriminating bunch – then they’re perfectly happy to embrace any change you throw at them.

    * It’s an essential component of the FCP X mythology that you have to be a Zen Master with many years of training to appreciate its complexities, to which the answer is: “Pull the other one.”

    Simon Ubsdell
    tokyo productions
    hawaiki

  • greg janza

    May 3, 2018 at 9:31 pm

    [Simon Ubsdell] “I think you have allowed Bill to mess with your head here.* FCP X is really, really, really not difficult to master – and master in depth.”

    Sorry Simon, I didn’t mean to add to the mythology of FCPX.

    You are correct that it’s easy to pick up and that many editors are highly adaptable to it. I learned it quickly as well.

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  • Simon Ubsdell

    May 3, 2018 at 9:36 pm

    [greg janza] “You are correct that it’s easy to pick up and that many editors are highly adaptable to it. I learned it quickly as well.”

    I learned it before it was even released commercially.

    Because, as soon as I saw the sneak peek, I went and got iMovie and familiarised myself with the fundamental paradigms.

    I know that is going to sound provocative but it’s true and it was extremely useful.

    I could actually work fluently with FCP X from Day One for that simple reason.

    Contrary to received opinion, FCP X is conceived from the ground up to be extremely easy to use. It’s bizarre to see claims that it’s complicated and difficult and deep.

    Simon Ubsdell
    tokyo productions
    hawaiki

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