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Forums Panasonic Cameras Question about SDX900 for Jan (or anyone that knows)

  • Question about SDX900 for Jan (or anyone that knows)

     Guy updated 17 years, 1 month ago 4 Members · 9 Posts
  • Jeremy Garchow

    December 11, 2005 at 2:46 am

    I know this has nothing to do with P2, but I figured this was the best place since there’s no forum for the SDX.

    The shop where I do most of my work is the proud owner of a new SDX900. While we need to go through some trial and error on setting up the menus, I was wondering how we should set it up if we are shooting 24pN (or 24pA). I notice there’s a menu to either shoot interlace or progressive. My inclination seems to want to turn it to progressive, but it defaults to interlace even when I select 24p mode, which seems to me I’d be shooting progressive and not interlace. The manual doesn’t say much and refers to shooting at 25p, which isn’t even an option on this camera. It also says that when it’s turned to progressive, it is shooting true progressive but stand to lose resolution if the V.Detail isn’t set to 0. Can someone please explain this to me? I want to shoot progressive, but I don’t want to lose resolution doing so. What happens if I turn the camera to 24p mode and shoot interlace? Does this mean that I don’t get true progressive frames? I’m kind of confused on this matter.

    Thanks for your time.

    Jeremy

    ———–
    G5 Dual 2Ghz <> 4GB RAM <> FCP 5.02 <> Kona 2
    ATTO 42XS <> Huge Systems 4105 Fibre

  • Chris Bell

    December 11, 2005 at 7:24 am

    The progressive mode is only for film print. Not good for NTSC as there would be too much vertical resolution. If you are shooting for NTSC, stay in the interlaced mode. 24p has a standard pulldown. 24pA has a different pulldown cadence for editing in a 24p timeline (progressive). It all depends how you are editing and what system you are using. 24pA is great if all your footage is shot in that mode. Edit in 24p, then FCP adds the pulldown when you output back to NTSC.

    Confused yet? Shoot tests… look at the difference between standard and advanced. Advanced is better if you know how you are going to edit.

    Chris Bell
    (former SDX owner)

  • Jeremy Garchow

    December 11, 2005 at 9:05 am

    Thanks for the info. I am totally aware of the difference between 24pN and 24pA and what that means to the edit, and thanks for pointing out that clarification. What confuses me is the difference between 24p interlace and 24p progressive. We all know what the p in 24p means, so what does the p in 24p mean when the camera is set to interlace?

    ———–
    G5 Dual 2Ghz <> 4GB RAM <> FCP 5.02 <> Kona 2
    ATTO 42XS <> Huge Systems 4105 Fibre

  • Graeme Nattress

    December 11, 2005 at 12:09 pm

    Sounds like it’s all to do with interlace filtering. That would be the vertical filter that reduces resolution by about 30% to stop interline interlace twitter on interlaced television. If you know it’s only going to be shown on true progressive displays, or projected, or sent to film, you don’t need this filtering, and removing it will give you a higher vertical resolution. This is why 1080i only has the same measured resolution as 720p.

    Graeme

    http://www.nattress.com – Film Effects and Standards Conversion for FCP

  • Jeremy Garchow

    December 11, 2005 at 6:04 pm

    Thanks for the response, Graeme. For the most part, our work is shown on Tvs and perhaps laptops via DVD coming in second. What’s the best way to shoot then since it’s a mix of interlaced displays and progressive? Sometimes for certain projects, our work is projected at large venues off of video, not film. Sounds like, for now, we will get the best results of we stick to interlaced.

    Jeremy

    ———–
    G5 Dual 2Ghz <> 4GB RAM <> FCP 5.02 <> Kona 2
    ATTO 42XS <> Huge Systems 4105 Fibre

  • Graeme Nattress

    December 11, 2005 at 9:44 pm

    Probably best to leave the filtering on, then I’d guess.

    Graeme

    http://www.nattress.com – Film Effects and Standards Conversion for FCP

  • Guy

    December 12, 2005 at 2:17 am

    It depends on what you are shooting. Progressive is higer resolution but can give you the twitter on things that have high detail or contrast. I usually prefer to shoot progressive. It is possible to add a slight vertical blur in post if you find the higher res looks bad on interlaced displays. Definetely do some tests. If you are hooked up to a good monitor you can clearly see what happens as you switch back and forth.

    BTW Get the Goodman’s guide(It’s free if you bought the camera new).

  • Jeremy Garchow

    December 12, 2005 at 3:12 am

    Cool, thanks Guy. Do you find shooting progressive causes more work in post? Are you blurring the whole timeline, or is it only in certain situations in certain shooting conditions? I will do testing as soon as the camera and deck are in the shop at the same time. I am looking for real world experience at this point.

    We got the Goodman’s guide and I quickly scanned it over, but it didn’t really explain this in as much detail as I’m looking for.

    Thanks again for the post.

    Jeremy

    ———–
    G5 Dual 2Ghz <> 4GB RAM <> FCP 5.02 <> Kona 2
    ATTO 42XS <> Huge Systems 4105 Fibre

  • Guy

    December 12, 2005 at 6:07 am

    It’s never been bad enough on the footage I’ve used to bother bluring it. I have seen footage where the twitter is very obvious and looks bad. Anything with very thin contrasty lines will flicker pretty bad on a CRT. I don’t think the twitter shows up on LCD TVs but I’m not sure. If I did blur it would only be certain scenes. If you need to blur the whole timeline you should just shoot interlace.

    BTW You should probably always use interlace if you are shooting actual interlaced footage.

    Another reason I like to shoot progressive is that if you need to up res to HD I think the extra detail would help.

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