Creative Communities of the World Forums

The peer to peer support community for media production professionals.

Forums Apple Final Cut Pro Legacy how to reduce echo from an audio file?

  • how to reduce echo from an audio file?

  • Kent Beeson

    March 19, 2008 at 1:47 am

    Just received a short VO in Spanish from a client – sounds good BUT there’s a hallow echo sound to it…anyway I can somehow reduce or eliminate this echo? May have been recorded in the talent’s kitchen or something…

    K

  • Jeremy Garchow

    March 19, 2008 at 3:16 am

    It’s tough, and can be next to impossible. Also, I am no audio guru, but a noise gate coupled with some EQ can sometimes get it close. Also, removing certain frequencies, depending on how your audio sounds, can sometimes remove what you need. It’s hard to know without hearing it.

    Search in this forum, and I bet you will find more in depth answers.

    Jeremy

  • Kent Beeson

    March 19, 2008 at 3:18 am

    Thanks for reply – I’ll try noise gate, see what happens…

    K

  • Jeff Pierce

    March 19, 2008 at 3:50 pm

    I’d pull the file into Soundtrack Pro, and take a whack at it with the EQ.

    The one you want is through this path: Process > Effects > MacOS > GraphicEQ.

    Once it’s open, select the 31 band.

    When you play the file, you will hear your adjustments in real-time. So though trial and error, you can isolate the problematic frequency(s).

    The ability for this to work depends on the frequency of the voice, the frequency of the echo, the extent of the echo, and your threshold for what is acceptable. At the very least, it’s a good first step.

    Good luck.

    Jeff Pierce

  • Kent Beeson

    March 19, 2008 at 4:20 pm

    Thanks Jeff

    Very helpful, so I right clicked on the audio track I wanted in the timeline, chose send to ST Pro audio file project, chose Process/effects, etc as yo said…played with the EQ, seems to work a bit, but now how do I save this – as Include Source Audio or Reference Source Audio? And how can I apply this same EQ effect on all 5 of my VO files without having to open each one in ST PRO?

    Thanks

    K

  • Jeff Pierce

    March 19, 2008 at 5:01 pm

    how do I save this – as Include Source Audio or Reference Source Audio?

    Neither… I save them as AIF files, and then import them like any other audio file into FCP.

    I’ve never quite understood the workflow for the “Send To ST Pro”. I’ve tried it to use it, and it seemed to be more of a hindrance than a help. My guess is that it just isn’t designed for what I’m doing… which is short-form spot production. Frame for frame, my production tends to be rather sophisticated, but it’s only in 30 second increments… so what works for me may be problematic for someone else.

    And how can I apply this same EQ effect on all 5 of my VO files without having to open each one in ST PRO?

    If I catch an audio problem prior to editing, then I will do the processing to the original file(s). But if the need for processing arises after editing, I generally export the portions I’ve used, and apply the effect to each of them.

    You can save the effect while you have the EQ interface open, then simply apply that effect to the other clips. But yes, you would have to bring them all into ST Pro.
    On a related note, saving the effect can be extremely useful if you regularly use the same voice person/people. If you find that “Dick” needs a little low-freq boost & mid-freq reduction, and “Jane” needs a high-freq boost… then you can save the EQ settings for each of them, and recall their effect every time you get a VO from Dick or Jane.

    Good luck.

    Jeff Pierce

  • Kent Beeson

    March 19, 2008 at 5:10 pm

    Very helpful, thanks again for your time and input…

    K

  • Jeremy Garchow

    March 19, 2008 at 5:16 pm

    [Jeff Pierce] “and recall their effect every time you get a VO from Dick or Jane. “

    Yeah, what’s up with Dick and Jane doing all of the VO in the world? I thought it was just me.

  • Jeff Pierce

    March 19, 2008 at 5:25 pm

    It’s a product of the Voiceover Deregulation Act of 2004. Since then, multi-national VO conglomerates — like Dick and Jane — have been gobbling up the little guys.

    What’s more, they’ve been moving all this VO work offshore. Now there are VO sweatshops in China where 14 year old girls are paid pennies an hour, and forced to speak into microphones for 16 hours a day.

    It’s a sad state of affairs!

  • Jeremy Garchow

    March 20, 2008 at 4:03 am

    Totally awesome.

Viewing 1 - 10 of 13 posts

Log in to reply.

We use anonymous cookies to give you the best experience we can.
Our Privacy policy | GDPR Policy