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Forums Apple Final Cut Pro X Duplicate or Snapshot

  • Duplicate or Snapshot

  • Greg Ball

    September 29, 2017 at 2:35 pm

    So I just finished the first rough cut of my video. I’m expecting client changes. In FCP 7 I would just copy the sequence to a new sequence and call it Sequence 2.

    I see that you can either Duplicate a project or duplicate a snapshot of the project. Am I correct to assume that Snapshot will be the way to go, so I can make client changes to the project while preserving the first cut?

    I don’t really have compound clips in the rough cut.

    Can I change the Snapshot label to call it – (Name of Project) Version #2? Any downside to doing this?

    How do you folks make copies of your timelines?

    What is the advantage of duplicating a project? When is that the way to go over a snapshot?

    Thanks so much.

    Greg Ball, President
    Ball Media Innovations, Inc.

    Miami Video Production Company | Miami to Orlando Florida | Corporate

  • Noah Kadner

    September 29, 2017 at 2:56 pm

    Choosing Snapshot vs Duplicate depends on whether your project timeline contains multicamera clips and compound clips. Snapshots will preserve those instances as they are in the project/ Duplicate will reference the originals.

    So later if you make changes to the compounds/multicams after a Snapshot- the snapshot version will not reflect those changes while a duplicate will. More details here:

    https://support.apple.com/kb/PH15846?locale=en_US

    Noah

    FCPWORKS – FCPX Workflow
    FCP Exchange – FCPX Workshops
    XinTwo – FCPX Training

  • Greg Ball

    September 29, 2017 at 4:29 pm

    Noah, I don’t have any multiclips or compound clips. But I want to keep the first cut and make changes on the second duplicate timeline. So which do I use?

    Greg Ball, President
    Ball Media Innovations, Inc.

    Miami Video Production Company | Miami to Orlando Florida | Corporate

  • Greg Ball

    September 29, 2017 at 4:31 pm

    That article does not explain why or how to use a duplicate clip. That’s why I’ve asked those with practical experience.

    Greg Ball, President
    Ball Media Innovations, Inc.

    Miami Video Production Company | Miami to Orlando Florida | Corporate

  • Noah Kadner

    September 29, 2017 at 5:24 pm

    Snapshot will do that- leave a pristine copy of the current version. Just make sure you continue your work editing the original project not the snapshot.

    Noah

    FCPWORKS – FCPX Workflow
    FCP Exchange – FCPX Workshops
    XinTwo – FCPX Training

  • Andy Neil

    September 29, 2017 at 5:26 pm

    Duplicating is usually fine for most situations. Snapshot is specifically when you’re worried about making changes to a clip that pushes changes out to each instance (eg: a multiclip or compound clip).

    For example, if you do an edit and then later open the multiclip and adjust the color for one of the angles, that change will be reflected in all the instances of that angle in your sequence. Or if you create a compound clip with layered sound effects and decide to turn off one of the sounds, every instance of that compound clip in your sequence will now reflect that change.

    If you duplicate a sequence and make any of the above changes, those changes will be reflected in BOTH sequences because there is still a parent/child relationship between multiclips and compounds in any sequences you’ve edited them into.

    This is NOT true for snapshots. If you snapshot a sequence, then it will remain exactly the same in the snapshot even if you make changes to a compound or multiclip.

    Andy

    https://plus.google.com/u/0/107277729326633563425/videos

  • Greg Ball

    September 29, 2017 at 6:58 pm

    Thank you Andy. So in my case, would just duplicate a Snapshot so I can keep the original, then just label the Snapshot as Version 2?

    I really don’t see any point in duplicating a project when everything I change in the duplicated project will be reflected in the original. Thoughts?

    Greg Ball, President
    Ball Media Innovations, Inc.

    Miami Video Production Company | Miami to Orlando Florida | Corporate

  • Greg Ball

    September 29, 2017 at 7:47 pm

    I just found another article. So my understanding after reading that article is that you either duplicate or snapshot your project to keep that as the original, and you make your changes to the Original version. A little different than what we did with FCP 7. Does that sound logical?

    Greg Ball, President
    Ball Media Innovations, Inc.

    Miami Video Production Company | Miami to Orlando Florida | Corporate

  • Andy Neil

    September 29, 2017 at 7:51 pm

    [Greg Ball] “So in my case, would just duplicate a Snapshot so I can keep the original, then just label the Snapshot as Version 2?

    That would not help you. The snapshot should be v1, and then you continue with your main project as v2. Think of the snapshot as a…picture. You don’t want anything to change in v1 in case you need to go back.

    [Greg Ball] “I really don’t see any point in duplicating a project when everything I change in the duplicated project will be reflected in the original. Thoughts?”

    You’re missing a key element in understanding the difference I think. Things you change in the duplicate sequence DO NOT CHANGE the original sequence. A duplicate sequence works like a duplicate file in almost any other program.

    What we’re talking about, and why you have the option of the snapshot in the first place, is because multiclips and compound clips are special little animals. Changes to a master multiclip in the BROWSER (not inside a timeline) will ripple into any sequence that you edited it into.

    Maybe think of it like a river with a fork in it. If you add red dye in the river before the fork, you end up with two red streams. But if you add red to one stream after the fork, you only have one red stream. Does that make sense?

    Regardless, if you don’t have multiclips or compounds in your work, you can safely use duplicates, although there’s no reason you CAN’T use the snapshot feature. Just make sure that your snapshot is labeled as your older version. That’s how changes remain frozen.

    Andy

    https://plus.google.com/u/0/107277729326633563425/videos

  • Jeff Kirkland

    September 29, 2017 at 9:50 pm

    That would be correct although I personally think you do that with a snapshot more than you would with a duplicate. As others have said a snapshot is exactly what the name implies – a copy of the project, completely frozen in time. Create a snapshot and carry on editing the original knowing that you can go back to that point if you need to and nothing you change upstream will have any effect on it.

    If I create a duplicate, it’s more because I want to use it as the basis of a new version so I’ll rename that to V2 and continue editing. In this case, I don’t want to break the upstream relationships with compound or multicam clips – if I go back and tweak something in an upstream compound clip, I want it to ripple down to both the v1 and v2 versions.

    A good example is the common practice of putting a temp music track inside a compound clip and editing with that clip – allowing you to swap the music track out globally by just replacing the track inside the compound clip. Duplicate projects maintain their upstream relationship so every duplicate project will inherit the changed music track whereas snapshots are frozen in time so the change won’t happen to them and they will keep the temp track.

    Which one you use depends on what changes you want the project to be able to inherit later.

    —-
    Jeff Kirkland | Video Producer & Cinematographer
    Hobart, Tasmania | Twitter: @jeffkirkland

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