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Forums Audio Engineering Corrupt WAV file recovery

  • Corrupt WAV file recovery

     Joe Bressler updated 5 years, 8 months ago 13 Members · 29 Posts
  • Daisuke Kinouchi

    September 29, 2010 at 2:22 am

    Hi,
    I have a WAV file recorded on Edirol R44, and the file seems to be corrupted. The file size is about 240MB but it does not show running time when I open the info. The data seems to be there but it only opens on VLC. Is there any software that I can repair/ recover the WAV file, preferably for Mac?

  • Ty Ford

    September 29, 2010 at 2:33 am

    Hello Daisuke and welcome to the Cow Audio Forum.

    Try Wave Agent and let us know what happens.

    https://www.sounddevices.com/products/waveagent.htm

    Regards,

    Ty Ford

    Want better production audio?: Ty Ford’s Audio Bootcamp Field Guide
    Watch Ty play guitar

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  • Daisuke Kinouchi

    September 29, 2010 at 3:51 am

    Thank you for a quick response. I imported the file in Wave Agent, but it does not play back. Only Info that show up are Filename, Channels (4 poly), Starting TC, and Date, which seem correct. The Length shows 00:00:00 on Wave Agent, but when I play back on VLC the file is 7:20 long.

  • Ty Ford

    September 29, 2010 at 12:51 pm

    what’s VLC?

    Ty

    Want better production audio?: Ty Ford’s Audio Bootcamp Field Guide
    Watch Ty play guitar

  • Jean-Christophe Boulay

    September 29, 2010 at 2:01 pm

    Chalk up one new miracle for VLC. With the info WaveAgent gives you, I think you’re very lucky that VLC can somehow read the file. It seems the recorder didn’t close the file properly. I don’t think you’re going to be able to repair the file while maintaining both audio and metadata.

    I’d try rerecording the audio to another file, either through Audio Hijack or by physically routing an output from your computer to a recorder or another computer with some kind of recording software. You’ll lose timestamp info this way, but you still have the corrupt file and you can read its info in WaveAgent should you need to reference back to it. Depending on what software you’ll use the file in, there may be a way to reinsert the timecode info to the new file’s metadata. Not ideal by any means, but I think you’re in damage control territory already.

    IHTH,

    JC Boulay
    Technical Director
    Audio Z
    Montreal, Canada
    http://www.audioz.com

  • Jean-Christophe Boulay

    September 29, 2010 at 2:12 pm

    Hi Ty,

    I’m surprised you don’t know about VLC. Here I was thinking you knew everything! It’s an open source media player that has a solid reputation as being able to read everything. It lacks export and transcoding functions, but is a great player. As the saying goes, “if VLC can’t read it, you’re f’d”.

    https://www.videolan.org/

    I tought Ty something! yay!

    JC Boulay
    Technical Director
    Audio Z
    Montreal, Canada
    http://www.audioz.com

  • Ty Ford

    September 29, 2010 at 2:21 pm

    J-C,

    Wanna help me find the squeek in my clothes dryer? 🙂

    Ty

    Want better production audio?: Ty Ford’s Audio Bootcamp Field Guide
    Watch Ty play guitar

  • Daisuke Kinouchi

    September 29, 2010 at 6:07 pm

    Thanks. I’ll try re-recording. The file was originally recorded in 4 channel mono, and I’ll probably loose that but it sure will sound better than camera on board mic.

  • Bouke Vahl

    October 6, 2010 at 7:18 am

    If VLC can play it, and Wave Agent can display the metadata, it must be repairable.

    Wave is a very simple format. From what you describe, only a few bytes in the header are wrong (duration of the file)
    have a look here:

    https://ccrma.stanford.edu/courses/422/projects/WaveFormat/

    Look at ChunkSize and Subchunk2size.

    Also, if you have a BWF, there is also a BEXT entry besides the stuff noted here.

    If you can use a HEX editor, you can fix it yourself.
    Or, i can do it for you, on no cure-no pay base, but it will set you back a box of beer when done…

    Bouke

    https://www.videotoolshed.com/
    smart tools for video pros

  • Daisuke Kinouchi

    October 7, 2010 at 5:24 pm

    Thanks for the info. I’ll see my IT person can do this.

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