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  • Can Apple Be Trusted Ever Again?

  • John Chay

    June 28, 2011 at 3:20 pm

    https://www.onerivermedia.com/blog/?p=322

    Best article I’ve read coming from a professional user of FCP and the impact on business.

  • Paul Escamilla

    June 28, 2011 at 3:40 pm

    I will never trust them again. After 10-11 years as one of the world’s biggest Apple and FCP fanboys, I am planning not only a switch to Avid or Premiere, but possibly a switch to PCs. My work and livelihood is far too serious to be depending on a company that would do what Apple did last week. F them. Seriously. I hate to be harsh, but their behavior is inexcusable and indefensible. And TOTALLY unprofessional.

  • Craig Seeman

    June 28, 2011 at 3:43 pm

    It seems Autodesk still does fine with Smoke and Flame despite, Cinestream, Edit*, Combustion, Cleaner, all popular and dead ended.

    Of course that means the product has to fall into the “must have” category for some and that is not the case with FCPX, Motion, Compressor.

  • Tim Vaughan

    June 28, 2011 at 4:03 pm

    Truth be told (and after spending quite a few tens of thousands on equipment over the years), the only thing that was really holding us back from PC was FCP. All of the other programs we utilize operate on both (C4d, AE/Adobe Production Suite, etc), but we were spending some big money on Mac Pro’s, XServes (now discontinued), XSAN and Raids primarily for the FCP editing and media.
    So now with the demise of FCP, we’ve realized we can purchase a couple of PC’s for the price of a Mac Pro and easily farm out renders. With Avid and Premiere both running on either platform, we’ve decided to start just moving to the PC platform. The costs of upgrades to a different editing platform along with compatible plugins will pay for themselves within a year or two as the allocated budgets toward computing machines will be far less.
    I’ve been impressed (and I didn’t think it possible) with Windows 7 overall; and I guess overall I’m glad now that Apple did what they did. We’ll continue to use what we have, but there isn’t any reason to purchase any new “toys” at Apple now. These last few years have seen Apple innovate, while others have taken Apples concepts to a whole new level, (Android, Google, Amazon, etc) while Apple moseys forward to keep up. It’s like they come up with a great idea, and then move on. Case and point; FCP Studio.

    But honestly, one should never trust a company. They are in the market for profits and generally will do whatever it takes to increase its profits. Apple’s profits are in its smaller toys. Go in to any Apple store and you’ll see there are 30 casual shoppers to 1 business pro. I kinda had a feeling when the “business department” was cut to one guy to handle an entire quarter of the U.S.. Live and let live, it’s time to move on. The artists that once made the product are no longer welcome. Unless you do it their way. (Wasn’t that what they were originally fighting against in 1984? Fight the system, buy a Mac???)

    Tim
    Now featuring AVID Media Composer
    Apple XRAID, XServe, MacPro, Macbook Pro, XSAN, FCP Studio 7 (Sorry, no iMovie Pro)
    Apple Monitors, Flanders Scientific Broadcast, Panasonic AG-AF100
    Adobe Production Premium, Maxon Cinema 4d
    Beer fridge fully loaded.

  • Ben Starkey

    June 28, 2011 at 4:04 pm

    Agreed. Great writeup. My disappointment is obviously with the company direction and not as much with the FCP X app itself. This app just represents more clearly than anything before it the direction Apple is headed.

    Ben Starkey
    Color Correction & Grading
    Online Finishing
    Editor
    http://www.benstarkey.com

  • Alan Okey

    June 28, 2011 at 4:25 pm

    [Craig Seeman] “It seems Autodesk still does fine with Smoke and Flame despite, Cinestream, Edit*, Combustion, Cleaner, all popular and dead ended.”

    Autodesk is a huge conglomerate, every bit the “software black hole” that Marco Solorio has described Apple as being. It’s an interesting comparison, however, because Autodesk Media & Entertainment has gone in the exact opposite direction of Apple. They’ve killed off all of their low-cost low-end products and focused on high end solutions.

    There has been much ink devoted to speculation about the end of big iron systems, but despite everyone predicting the end of the dinosaurs, Flame and Smoke are still going strong after more than a decade. They have dropped in price, but are still actively being developed and improved.

  • Chris Kenny

    June 28, 2011 at 4:31 pm

    [John Chay] “https://www.onerivermedia.com/blog/?p=322

    Best article I’ve read coming from a professional user of FCP and the impact on business.”

    The idea that people make purchases on the basis of these sorts of abstract issues is, frankly, not well supported in general. My prediction is that customers who decide FCP X is, on the technical merits, the best choice for them (say) a year from now will very rarely go on to say “But we’re not going to buy it because Apple really didn’t communicate well about the introduction last year”.


    Digital Workflow/Colorist, Nice Dissolve.

    You should follow me on Twitter here. Or read our blog.

  • Craig Seeman

    June 28, 2011 at 4:47 pm

    [Chris Kenny] “”But we’re not going to buy it because Apple really didn’t communicate well about the introduction last year”.”

    Chris normally I agree with you but having worked at facilities of varying sizes for 20 years as an editor and being the senior engineer at another that did mostly broadcast work, there’s a lot of inertia.

    Most are adverse to moving to new tools. They may eventually but movement is slow. The inertia is always rational but often rationalized. I could give you a long list of boring personal stories for every facility I worked at but in every case there was a reluctance to move unless and until the conditions became overwhelmingly compelling to take a perceived (even if imagined) risk. Avid, for example, had a prolonged period of issues that pushed people to FCP. The EOL of Discreet Edit* forced others to move.

    Individuals are a bit more mobile and open though assuming costs are low and features are compelling.

  • John Chay

    June 28, 2011 at 4:50 pm

    Nothing abstract about it. There are companies like Avid and Adobe that have treated the professional community well. Avid has been around longer than FCP and they have never treated their customers like this. Avid is the same platform when I started using it 10 years ago.

    http://www.john-chay.com

    Editor/Videographer

  • Craig Seeman

    June 28, 2011 at 5:03 pm

    [John Chay] “Avid has been around longer than FCP and they have never treated their customers like this. “

    That’s flatly wrong. Their treatment of their customers is what gave FCP great avenue.
    There was Avid’s announcement of dropping Mac support around 2000 when FCP was in its infancy.
    There were exorbitantly expensive upgrades.
    There were exorbitantly expensive support contracts and, in my experience as both an Avid user from 1989-2001 and facility engineer and trainer, support response was pretty poor in my very direct experience.
    Avid was in a very shaky financial situation for a number of years, not due to poor products but poorly managed business and customer relations. The COW management can tell their own stories as well.
    I’d guess that one reason so many are looking at Premiere Pro is that Avid’s reputation still leaves a very bad taste in the mouths of us veterans.

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