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Activity Forums VEGAS Pro Blu ray or AVCHD

  • Blu ray or AVCHD

    Posted by Heinz Melus on October 6, 2011 at 9:08 am

    Hi

    I’m a consumer and not a Pro, I’m a newcomer on 1920×1080. I bought a Sony camcoder CX 550, which records in FX mode 1920×1080 24M in variable bitrate, file extension .mts and transfering to the PC .m2ts. I want o use consumer Players or/and a PC to get the ready product on my TV set. My second target is to archive the rendered work for many years on a media. I suggest Blu ray will be better on the long run than AVCHD???
    I rendered after many tries my first footage on Vegas 9. MS Media Player shows a good quality on my monitor. I used:
    Template Blue ray 1920×1080 50i, 25 Mbps
    Save Type Main Concept MPEG 2, var. bit rare, transport stream incl. Video & audio
    The video is in MPEG 2, audio MPEG
    The Explorer shows a file type .m2t and AVCHD as description.
    My next step is to get it on a Blu ray disk and to buy a player, which supports this format.
    I used DVD Architect 5.0 to create a Blu ray project. My first surprise is that audio is in PCM stereo. Non of my tests in Vegas showed me a template with PCM. Does DVD Arch convert automatically the MPEG stereo to PCM?? I’m puzzeled now.

    I also checked the Blue ray 1920×1080 50i, 16 Mbps Template. The audio is either AAC or AC-3, depending on the mpeg 2 or mpeg 4 stream. Also not PCM.

    What did I wrong? Is my task not realistic?
    What is wrong in the workflow? Are these not the correct templates?

    I would appreciate any reply.
    Thanks

    Heinz

    John Rofrano replied 9 years ago 3 Members · 37 Replies
  • 37 Replies
  • John Rofrano

    October 7, 2011 at 8:53 pm

    What’s wrong with your workflow is that Blu-ray authoring requires separate video and audio streams. That’s why the default Bu-ray templates in Vegas do not include audio. You should render your video without audio and then render your audio as Dolby Digital Pro AC3 for Blu-ray.

    BTW, PCM is called “Microsoft Wave” render in Vegas.

    ~jr

    http://www.johnrofrano.com
    http://www.vasst.com

  • Heinz Melus

    October 8, 2011 at 4:09 am

    Thanks John,
    your answers are always top.
    1. Could I come back to the Blu ray or AVCHD question. Do you agree that BR is the better standard for long time archiving and to play disks on a player?
    2. You propose to render audio in AC-3 rather than PCM as DVDA 5.0 requires. Does DVDA automatically convert it w/o loss? What is the reason for AC-3?
    Thank you

    Heinz

  • John Rofrano

    October 8, 2011 at 3:24 pm

    [heinz melus] “1. Could I come back to the Blu ray or AVCHD question. Do you agree that BR is the better standard for long time archiving and to play disks on a player?”

    AVCHD is a valid Blu-ray format so I’m not sure I understand your question. Blu-ray can contain MPEG2 or AVCHD. A 16Mbps AVCHD file has about the same quality as a 25Mbps MPEG2 file. So either are equalling appropriate for Blu-ray.

    [heinz melus] “2. You propose to render audio in AC-3 rather than PCM as DVDA 5.0 requires. Does DVDA automatically convert it w/o loss? What is the reason for AC-3?”

    If you have the free space on your disc, PCM is higher quality because it is lossless. Most videos don’t have room for PCM audio so AC3 is the next best thing. If you video length doesn’t approach the capacity of your disc, you can certainly render a PCM WAV file and see if it will fit. The important thing is that you NOT use MPEG2 audio because DVD Architect will be forced to convert it to either PCM or AC3 which means two renders and more loss of quality. In other words, it’s better to feed it the correct format to begin with and avoid extra renders.

    ~jr

    http://www.johnrofrano.com
    http://www.vasst.com

  • Heinz Melus

    August 17, 2012 at 3:01 pm

    Hi John,
    i would like to get an advise again. You helped me to decide to buy Vegas 11 Pro and to get a well configured WS. I’m on retirement and digitize my V8 & DV footage. The new footage taken with CX 550 will be Blu_Ray. For optical scene detection on V8 you recommended Sceneanalyzer.
    My next issue is the audio noise and simple edit. My holiday and birthday footage has a lot of external noise: traffic in town, motor boat, wind, water etc. I would like to do:
    a simple SW to reduce Noise and edit Audio (cut, paste, stretch etc)in connection with Vegas. My films are only for home use to relatives and friends. Solutions as SF 10 Pro or NR2 would be too expensive and too complicated to use. May be 10% use. Could you recommend me any solution to do this inside Vegas. Is there a solution for 100$ ??

    Heinz

  • John Rofrano

    August 18, 2012 at 8:15 pm

    [heinz melus] “Could you recommend me any solution to do this inside Vegas. Is there a solution for 100$ ??”

    There are no plug-ins in Vegas that perform audio noise reduction. iZotope RX2 is the best but I realize you can’t afford that as a hobbyist. In the past I would have recommended BIAS Sound Soap 2 but BIAS went out of business a few months ago. However, I see that many retailers are still selling it. It’s up to you if you want to buy software that has been discontinued. Perhaps you can download a trial and determine if it suits your needs.

    ~jr

    http://www.johnrofrano.com
    http://www.vasst.com

  • Heinz Melus

    August 20, 2012 at 7:28 am

    Hi John,
    thank you for this excellent advise. I tried the Soundsoap trial on my Vegas 11 64 bit version as a VST plugin. I used .avi and .mts files with noise. It’s easy to use and works fine. For hobbyist it is more than good. I ordered already at Amazon.

    Thank you and all the best.

    Heinz

  • John Rofrano

    August 20, 2012 at 8:05 pm

    Great glad that worked out for you.

    ~jr

    http://www.johnrofrano.com
    http://www.vasst.com

  • Heinz Melus

    September 18, 2012 at 12:43 pm

    Hi John,
    I have another question to you as a Pro. I captured all my footage V8 and HiV8 into Vegas 11. I used the SceneAnalyzer. Soundsoap works fine. All footage was from me in PAL. I have now NTSC-VHS tapes which I bought in US & Mexico. I have a VCR Philps VR969/58 Multisystem, bought in Europe, which can read NTSC tapes. I can see our sea diving on a modern TV set in color. When I capture through ADCV300 (DIP sw 1-5 changed to NTSC, all others off) the footage is B\W. The VR969 is marketed as semipro equipment. I use S-Video and Audio cables. The user manual doesn’t give any spec on the different video systems. Do you know, where to find the specs for the NTSC output? May be it is not a true NTSC 3.58 output, but the TV set can read it, not the ADCV. Or do I need other DIP swithes to switch on?
    Appreciate your reply

    Heinz

  • John Rofrano

    September 18, 2012 at 2:13 pm

    [heinz melus] “I have a VCR Philps VR969/58 Multisystem, bought in Europe, which can read NTSC tapes. I can see our sea diving on a modern TV set in color. When I capture through ADCV300 (DIP sw 1-5 changed to NTSC, all others off) the footage is BW. “

    I assume that the Philps VR969/58 Multisystem reads NTSC and outputs PAL since your TV (which is PAL) is playing the signal. That means the output is PAL (even though the input is NTSC) so switch the ADVC300 back to PAL and see if that works.

    ~jr

    http://www.johnrofrano.com
    http://www.vasst.com

  • Heinz Melus

    September 19, 2012 at 8:19 am

    Thanks John! I tried already any switch position on the ADVC300 – no good result, either nothing or B\W. I searched a lot in the internet. May be it is PAL-60 (color PAL, rest NTSC). I have to find a NTSC VCR machine or a workflow to get it into DV. My weak point is that I don’t know what the VCR outputs. (No specs available). Its display says NTSC playing. The ADVC does not recognize it. Anyway thanks.

    Heinz

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