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Forums DaVinci Resolve Suddenly version 17.0 & 17.1 are not compatible with Mojave?

  • Suddenly version 17.0 & 17.1 are not compatible with Mojave?

     Neil Sadwelkar updated 2 weeks, 6 days ago 6 Members · 12 Posts
  • Russ Johnson

    March 10, 2021 at 6:02 pm

    My Resolve machine is a 2010 MacPro upgraded to 5,1 and running Mojave. I’ve been following along for months updating with most of the new beta versions without major problems. I downloaded and started to install the “shipping” version of 17.1 and started the installer only to notice that it lists Catalina as a base requirement. Am I out of luck or will it run on Mojave?

  • Robert Ober

    March 16, 2021 at 7:32 pm

    I had a similar issue with Wirecast. It is so annoying that folks are not supporting the older versions. Especially when the Betas work.

    Hang in there,

    Robert

  • Oliver Peters

    March 18, 2021 at 5:50 pm

    Catalina is the minimum for most Mac apps these days and it will soon be Big Sur. Old macOS versions are supported to a point, but only a couple of versions back. I’m sure you’re Mac Pro is a workhorse, but it IS 11 years old 🙂 And now it’s locked to Mohave or before.

    If you want the latest version of an app, you’ll need to stay up to date on the OS. Unfortunately that’s just the way it is. I just had to update my mid-2014 MBP to Big Sur (from Mojave), because I had at least 6 or 7 apps that couldn’t be updated.

    That being said, why do you feel the need to move to R17.1? What doesn’t R16 do for you?

  • Robert Ober

    March 19, 2021 at 2:41 pm

    Oliver,

    I have appreciated your writings over the years, but keep in mind that many of us are on tight budgets and even some bigger organizations still have cheesegraters running mission critical apps. It is not that difficult to allow one’s apps to run on older versions and just have a caveat that states it will not be supported.

    And as you probably know, one can upgrade a cheesegrater with SSDs, RAID, and NVIDIA graphics cards and have a system that will do DCI 4K and probably higher frame sizes.

    I will restate a previous sentence more pointedly, allowing the betas to run on the older OS, but not the release is really crappy. Having worked at a large software company and a large computer manufacturer, I can assure you the release versions are very close to the last beta.

    Y’all take care,

    Robert

  • Oliver Peters

    March 19, 2021 at 2:59 pm

    Thanks. I don’t disagree with any of that. I had my own mid-2009 cheese grater until earlier this year, to which I have done a lot of upgrades over the years. But in the end, I needed a better machine and gave it away to a student rather than deal with eBay, Craig’s list, etc. A new iMac more than replaced its functions.

    But, yes, I know that there are plenty of older Avid installations still running on old Mac Pros. They are workhorses. However, the software industry has move to 64-bit and that’s a clear demarkation for both macOS and Windows. In that process, the OS versions have finally gone exclusively 64-bit and thus deprecated all 32-bit dependencies. Therefore, app developers have had to follow in the same direction.

    Honestly, I have no idea whether or not old Mac Pros have the hardware capabilities to only run as 64-bit machines or whether there are real limitations. Or whether it’s simply Apple restricting the OS installation.

    Maybe under Boot Camp, you could install Windows 10 and the newer (Windows) applications you want. I haven’t tried it and haven’t heard of anyone else doing it. There are plenty of cost-effective PCs that will blow the doors off of any old Mac Pro, no matter how upgraded it is. So probably people going Windows have gone that route instead.

    My point is that you still have a very useful Mac Pro that can still run software within a couple of years of being current. But you are essentially frozen in time. That’s not a bad thing. Think of it as driving a reliable 10-year-old vehicle instead of moving up to a brand new Tesla 🙂

    Oliver

  • Robert Ober

    March 19, 2021 at 3:19 pm

    macOS(OS X) has been 64 bit for some time. My understanding is that is started with Snow Leopard. What Apple killed with Catalina was the ability to run 32 bit apps. That is not even the issue with Wirecast and Resolve not supporting High Sierra and Mojave. I have not seen any info as to why they do not, but I would think it is not wanting to support the older OS versions as things like Metal are not there.

    I am an IT Consultant among other things so I do have Windows running on this cheesegrater both in Bootcamp and Parallels. But surely you understand that running Windows is an extreme last resort for most Mac folks. And those inexpensive Windows machines are crap compared to the build quality and reliability of a cheesegrater. I know as some of my customers have some of them.

    I also don’t understand why folks defend corporations. They are not your friend.

    Y’all have some fun,

    Robert

  • Hans Vernhout

    March 19, 2021 at 3:28 pm

    Maybe I did not discover the incompatibilities yet but on our iMac 5K Resolve 17.1 Studio is running just fine under Mojave (10.14.6).

    I would just try to run it and see what happens on your system.

  • Robert Ober

    March 19, 2021 at 3:33 pm

    Hans,

    Good point. I assumed it wouldn’t install.

    🙂

  • Robert Ober

    March 23, 2021 at 8:07 pm

    Just tried the 17.1 Studio install on my cheesegrater with High Sierra and the dongle inserted. Installer gives error about incompatible OS and will not install.

    Sucks!

  • Hans Vernhout

    March 29, 2021 at 8:53 am

    In addition to my earlier reply: Davinci Resolve 17.1 appeared to have some GPU issues on our Mojave setup. We upgraded to BigSur which solved the problems.

    So Mojave may not be a solid setup with Resolve 17.1 after all.

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