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Forums Adobe Premiere Pro Skip Conforming Audio in Premiere Pro?

  • Skip Conforming Audio in Premiere Pro?

  • Marc Brak

    November 1, 2005 at 10:00 am

    Conforming Audio is a pain in the neck. Can’t this be turned off? I don’t see why i should have 60 minutes of audio conformed if only 5 minutes of material make the final cut..!

    Prem. Pro’s audio conforming is eating away my system performance and gigabytes… can anybody help?

  • Tim Kurkoski

    November 1, 2005 at 6:43 pm

    No, you can’t turn it off.

    Although it’s a little bit of a pain, it’s really a good thing. It allows Premiere Pro to handle audio much better than Premiere 6 and the previous versions (there were some horrible audio problems that you could run into). Maybe in the next version conforming will be a bit smoother.

    Best thing you could do with this version is to set up a separate hard drive for the conformed audio scratch disk. That should speed up performance, and as long as you don’t clog up the drive, take care of your space worries.

  • Aaron Strader

    November 1, 2005 at 6:55 pm

    Seeing as how it’s going to do it no matter what, take this time to embrace what is referred to in the industry as a “Coffee/Cigarette Break”. Take it, enjoy it and don’t stress out. The conformed files can be deleted as soon as you finish the project.

    Also of note, you CAN start editing your project while it’s conforming. If you don’t apply any transitions or effects during the conforming process it should be stable enough to start cutting. The conforming will take a wee bit longer, but it won’t be anything outrageous. I time the conforming at about 5 minutes per hour of ingested footage on the machines I work on.

    -Aaron

    PhenQ Review – Complete Truth About This Fat Burner Pill


    Knock it off! I like my radio and television the way it is…

  • Blast1

    November 1, 2005 at 7:46 pm

    [Aaron Strader] “The conforming will take a wee bit longer, but it won’t be anything outrageous. I time the conforming at about 5 minutes per hour of ingested footage on the machines I work on.”

    Conforming audio is a pain in the *, I work with a minimum of 4hrs and up to 8hrs, its not necessary for cutting, it should be optional at the control of the editor.

  • Tim Kolb

    November 1, 2005 at 8:51 pm

    It’s a pain, no question.

    I think the complaint has been heard many times at Adobe…originally it was an effort to reverse the audio fortunes that the other Tim mentions…more realtime, better response, uniform audio data right from the beginning.

    It delivers the functionality intended…it just needs to be applied with discretion. We’ll see what the next version brings…

    TimK,

    Kolb Syverson Communications,
    Creative Cow Host,
    2004-2005 NAB Post Production Conference
    Premiere Pro Technical Chair,
    Author, “The Easy Guide to Premiere Pro” http://www.focalpress.com
    “Premiere Pro Fast Track DVD Series” http://www.classondemand.net

  • Video Opp

    November 1, 2005 at 10:02 pm

    Some of my projects reference 20+ hours of interviews and Broll. All of the audio for this material is already at 48K. There is no good reason that a product with a Pro designation should not have a user switch for this feature. I can understand how some things get overlooked on a release, but I cannot understand why Adobe has not released a patch to fix this and a few other oversights. If not a patch, why not a new release?? It is one thing to wait 1.5 – 2 years between releases of a product or product fixes when you are dealing with a program for hobbyists, but when professional people are making your living with your software, I would think that you would want to keep the upgrade flow going pretty swift, if you want to attract or keep your clientele. There are other options out there. The cost of switching is not that much…. 1.5 is getting “very long in the tooth” Other options are looking very atractive.

    I know that every time I complain about the slow releases someone will write and say something about how many people complained that the last release from 1.0 -1.5 was too fast and that Adobe was just looking for a quick fix of upgrade income. Really? People don’t have to upgrade. They can skip a few versions. It is a choice. For me, if just one new feature saves me only one hour of time or frustration, it is worth the cost of the upgrade. I would have my credit card out every month, if I knew that a feature would save me time.

    Just release it already, and let the users decide if it is worth it to them to upgrade.

    My 2 cents, again…..

  • Tim Kurkoski

    November 2, 2005 at 2:16 am

    All of the audio for this material is already at 48K

    Ah, but it’s not 32-bit float, which is what Premiere Pro is transcoding to.

    My general opinion about the whole conforming situation is that while it’s a pain, especially for workflows like yours, you can’t please everyone all the time. Adobe took the “safe” route at the cost of performance. For your case, the best thing you can do is concentrate on upgrading your machine’s performance.

  • Tim Kolb

    November 2, 2005 at 5:22 am

    [Video Opp] “They can skip a few versions. It is a choice. For me, if just one new feature saves me only one hour of time or frustration, it is worth the cost of the upgrade. I would have my credit card out every month, if I knew that a feature would save me time.”

    Bringing out a revised software package is not a no-cost endeavor. bringing an upgrade out every other quarter is do-able for a plugin or patching a major app, but to re-release an entire major app even twice a year would be a challenge to say the least.

    FWIW, I’m with you on the conforming…it can be a pain and should be switchable. For the record, I’m not sure that Adobe is fighting this. After v1, the complaints were pretty plain…however the entire audio portion of the software bases its functionality on the conformed audio concept so there are a lot of items that need re-coding and I suspect that Adobe wasn’t defying user’s complaints…it most likely came down to what was possible to re-do in a given period of time for a dot release.

    TimK,

    Kolb Syverson Communications,
    Creative Cow Host,
    2004-2005 NAB Post Production Conference
    Premiere Pro Technical Chair,
    Author, “The Easy Guide to Premiere Pro” http://www.focalpress.com
    “Premiere Pro Fast Track DVD Series” http://www.classondemand.net

  • Marc Brak

    November 2, 2005 at 6:55 am

    Okay, so no fix.

    Another question: why is it that when a certain clip is used in several different projects, the audio for that same file needs to be conformed all over again for every different .prproj file?

    For instance i have 1 project file festuring a short movie, and one featuring its trailer. Both draw from the same library of clips – that is being conformed TWICE then, once for every project.

    Ridiculous, I say. Any solutions?

  • Kenneth Hahn

    November 2, 2005 at 7:25 am

    I had that problem in the past also. I got around this by just creating seperate Sequences within the original(Master) project that are using the same footage.

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