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  • Pre-Production Considerations

  • Eric Klassen

    May 9, 2007 at 7:51 pm

    Hi Everyone,

    I’m in the process of writing a business plan for a production that involves a lot of interviews and slow motion. I’ve recently been told about digital cameras able to shoot at 500fps and 1000fps (i.e. Planet Earth). I’m looking for something that can switch between 160fps to about 300fps. We will need two cameras to shoot the interviews at 24p, I’m thinking the Panasonics HVX200 will work well enough since the project is going straight to DVD. The slow motion camera work will involve moving the camera around quite a bit — very dynamic camera work. There will also be some lipstick work on moving subjects.

    I have a few questions around this:
    1) What should the equipment be for slow motion and lipstick if we are using the Panasonic HVX200 for the interviews and b-roll?
    2) Given the different capture formats of slow motion and lipstick set ups, how can I best preserve shot-to-shot continuity? In other words, is there going to be a drastic shift in the quality of the shots moving between the different cameras?
    3) What should we be aware of for post in bringing in captured content from these different kinds of cameras?

    Thanks in advance,
    Eric

  • Shane Ross

    May 9, 2007 at 8:11 pm

    [E Klassen] “I’ve recently been told about digital cameras able to shoot at 500fps and 1000fps (i.e. Planet Earth). I’m looking for something that can switch between 160fps to about 300fps.”

    Those were film cameras. 55% of PLANET EARTH was 35mm…another 25% was Super 16mm…and the remaining 20% was Panasonic Varicam. I had the benefit of hearing this from one of the DPs of that show first hand.

    Video cameras don’t shoot more than 60fps…60p. That you can turn into nice slow motion, but not what you are asking. There are computer cameras that can record 200-2000 fps (the stuff you see when a bullet is fired thru objects)…but they aren’t normal video cameras.

    [E Klassen] “3) What should we be aware of for post in bringing in captured content from these different kinds of cameras?”

    Capture everything as the same codec. Or, get FCP 6 and capture everything native and use the new mixed timeline option. Get an Intel Mac for best results.

    Shane

    Littlefrog Post
    http://www.lfhd.net

  • Russell Lasson

    May 9, 2007 at 8:18 pm

    The only camera that I know of that shoots more than 60fps is the Pantom. I was blown away by the quality of it at NAB. It shoots up to 1000fps as a 2K image sequence. From there you would want to convert to whatever you’ll finish to (1080i or 720p). The camera really kicks butt. It might be overkill for your budget at $2000/day or $6000/week.

    https://www.visionresearch.com/index.cfm?sector=htm/files&page=camera_HD_new
    https://www.abelcine.com/store/product.php?productid=1000203&cat=785&page=1

    For a lipstick camera, the HD-RH1 by Iconix is something to consider. You’ll need to bring a recording system with you. (Does the HVX-200 support component in?)

    https://www.iconixvideo.com/products.html

    The rest of the questions really depend on what cameras and workflows you end up using.

    -Russ

  • Shane Ross

    May 9, 2007 at 8:21 pm

    THAT’S the camera…the Phantom. Guess it improved since the last time we used it. Now it can export to the proper HD size and framing. When we used it (for explosions) we had issues getting the footage to work right. When we did, though…it looked great.

    Thanks Russell…I was trying to figure out what camera that was…calling producers and the company that I worked for…googling it…

    Shane

    Littlefrog Post
    http://www.lfhd.net

  • gary adcock

    May 9, 2007 at 8:38 pm

    [E Klassen] ” I’m looking for something that can switch between 160fps to about 300fps. We will need two cameras to shoot the interviews at 24p, I’m thinking the Panasonics HVX200 will work well enough since the project is going straight to DVD.”

    The HVX may not be the best choice for this if you are trying to match the High speed cameras- remember to match the High end camera to the cheaper one.

    I highly recommend the Vision Research cameras – the v10 or Phantom HD will fit your demands -shooting from 1 fps to 10,000 depending on your needs. I have now worked with them a number of times and they have never failed me.

    “) What should the equipment be for slow motion and lipstick if we are using the Panasonic HVX200 for the interviews and b-roll?”

    Just understand they will look different – use it to your advantage.

    “Given the different capture formats of slow motion and lipstick set ups, how can I best preserve shot-to-shot continuity? In other words, is there going to be a drastic shift in the quality of the shots moving between the different cameras?”

    Planning and a meeting with your Gaffer and colorist will solve any number of issues in this area, and test, test, test.

    “What should we be aware of for post in bringing in captured content from these different kinds of cameras?”

    Pick ONE format and stick to it. Most of these camera all shoot different formats you only need one.

    gary adcock
    Studio37
    HD & Film Consultation
    Post and Production Workflows

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