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Forums Apple Final Cut Pro X Media Sharing

  • Media Sharing

  • James Ewart

    August 29, 2014 at 11:55 am

    Just working my way rough Ripple Media Management tutorial and on the “Workgroup” section.

    I do not usually or ever work this way but thought I would enlighten myself.

    By each editor “leaving files in place” thus creating Sym Links in his/her own library each editor can be working with the same media at the same time. That sounds very clever. I’m just interested how this works because I was led to believe (obviously wrongly) that this was never possible with any SAN solution be it FCP, AVID or Adobe.

    Excuse my ignorance but I would be grateful for enlightenment.

  • Oliver Peters

    August 29, 2014 at 12:36 pm

    This has always been possible with Premiere, FCP X, FCP 7 and similar NLEs for nearly two decades. Sorry 😉

    Avid is a bit different because its MediaFiles folders are like FCPX self-contained libraries. You can’t have multiple access to these unless you use a Unity storage system. A few companies like EditShare have devised Avid-specific workaraounds.

    Oliver

    Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
    Orlando, FL
    http://www.oliverpeters.com

  • James Ewart

    August 29, 2014 at 12:50 pm

    Thanks Oliver

    I can’t get my head round two or more people using the same files at the same time but I guess that’s what Video on Demand is all about.

    oh well – it’s good to know one’s limitations. ; – D

  • Brett Sherman

    August 29, 2014 at 1:35 pm

    There were a few hurdles that FCP X has eliminated that previously made this harder. The first hurdle was they allowed you to import media into an external folder not connected with the library file. The second is they now allow the cache to be stored outside the library, so this has greatly reduced the size of the library file. Where once it wasted disk space and time to duplicate library files, it is now simple and fast.

    Personally I think the file structure of FCP X is better positioned to allow multiple users to access the same library at the same time which would really allow for more collaborative workflows, but whether Apple will do this is questionable.

  • James Ewart

    August 29, 2014 at 3:48 pm

    “… the file structure of FCP X is better positioned to allow multiple users to access the same library at the same time ”

    In such a scenario how would I prevent you messing with my project/timeline inadvertently for example?

    I guess some kind of virtual lock?

  • Oliver Peters

    August 29, 2014 at 4:10 pm

    [James Ewart] “In such a scenario how would I prevent you messing with my project/timeline inadvertently for example?
    I guess some kind of virtual lock?”

    Now you are getting into details that will make your head spin 😉

    There are lots of ways to set up SANs and NASs. You can have volume-based and file-based SANs and administration can be set up with server-based tools, like Apple OS X Server and AFP, and/or dedicated SAN software, XSAN, FibreJet, etc.

    With FCP X, libraries can be local or on the SAN, but can only be accessed by a single user at any given time. The only NLEs that permit true project sharing for simultaneous editing within a common project are Avid Media Composer and Lightworks. NLEs like FCP and Premiere can “fake it” by using duplicate copies of the project/data/library file(s) that reside locally on each editor’s machine.

    Where permissions and control and locking come into play are in how many users can simultaneously write to the data files at the same time. Avid can do this, because each bin is a separate data file, so Editor A is working on a sequence that exists in Bin A and Editor B is working on a copy of that same sequence that exists in Bin B. Many film projects have 2-10 people all working on the exact same, common, master Avid project. The process works, because at the end of the day, some human has to compare the two (or more) sequences and decide which is the final version or what the combination of these should be the final.

    FCP 7 users have mimicked this same scenario, by placing a copy of a sequence into a duplicate FCP 7 Project. Then the two editors work separately. At the end of the day, one of them has to combine the FCP 7 Projects into a single master project.

    – Oliver

    Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
    Orlando, FL
    http://www.oliverpeters.com

  • Charlie Austin

    August 29, 2014 at 5:44 pm

    [Oliver Peters] “here permissions and control and locking come into play are in how many users can simultaneously write to the data files at the same time. Avid can do this, because each bin is a separate data file, so Editor A is working on a sequence that exists in Bin A and Editor B is working on a copy of that same sequence that exists in Bin B. Many film projects have 2-10 people all working on the exact same, common, master Avid project. The process works, because at the end of the day, some human has to compare the two (or more) sequences and decide which is the final version or what the combination of these should be the final.”

    Thanks for that, having not cut on MC in a multi-editor scenario I never knew exactly how that worked. So, in theory… If X libraries were multi-user, you’d be able to (somehow) bring in an Event for each editor, all of whom would start with an identical project. Every user would see all the events, but could only work in their own unless it was “released” to a single user, at which point the projects could be combined. Then, everyone takes theirs back, rinse/repeat?

    ————————————————————-

    ~ My FCPX Babbling blog ~
    ~”It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools.”~
    ~”The function you just attempted is not yet implemented”~

  • Oliver Peters

    August 29, 2014 at 7:41 pm

    [Charlie Austin] “you’d be able to (somehow) bring in an Event for each editor, all of whom would start with an identical project. Every user would see all the events, but could only work in their own unless it was “released” to a single user, at which point the projects could be combined”

    Sounds plausible.

    – Oliver

    Oliver Peters Post Production Services, LLC
    Orlando, FL
    http://www.oliverpeters.com

  • Charlie Austin

    August 30, 2014 at 5:40 am

    [Oliver Peters] “Sounds plausible.”

    It kinda does huh? That would be nice…

    ————————————————————-

    ~ My FCPX Babbling blog ~
    ~”It is a poor craftsman who blames his tools.”~
    ~”The function you just attempted is not yet implemented”~

  • James Ewart

    August 30, 2014 at 7:38 am

    Thanks for that.

    I spend much more time asking questions here than I do answering them so I appreciate your taking the time Oliver and all…

    This must be the Media Management to which all my Avid editor friends refer when they are trying to explain their preference (apart from that’s the tool they prefer anyway which is cool with me).

    The Duplicate Libraries with Events containing Sym links to the same files and then using “Transfer Libraries” (Ripple term) for me to be able to share my latest version with you seems a good solution.
    I am interested in the land of the Hollywood blockbuster why so may working on the exact same cut?

    Things could get very messy no? How does that work please I am intrigued.

    Many thanks

    James

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