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Forums Apple Final Cut Pro X Magnetic Timeline and Broadcast Programming

  • Magnetic Timeline and Broadcast Programming

  • Mark Maness

    October 31, 2012 at 4:59 pm

    Hello All,

    I’ve read thru the COW on magnetic timeline discussions but I still haven’t found an answer to my delima.

    Our house does weekly broadcast programming with drop dead set timing. Before using FCP X, we’d edit about 3/4 a show before setting our show ending. Basically, I have a show that ends at 29:15, so I’d drop my show close to end at 29:15 and back time to fill the area (it nice to have this flexibility and not shoot based on scripts).

    We haven’t made the jump to FCP X because we haven’t found an easy way to do this. Its been an experience to say the least when it comes to timing a show. Too much floating around. While I love the idea of the magnetic timeline, its been a real pain to edit with our workflow.

    Has anyone dealt with this?

    _______________________________

    Wayne Carey
    Schazam Productions
    schazamproductions@mac.com

  • Andy Neil

    October 31, 2012 at 5:29 pm

    You can create a gap clip to place in the primary storyline up to the point where your close goes. Then you can use the overwrite command when editing to overwrite the gap until you get to the end. It’s kind of the same way you’d edit on FCP (only you don’t have to add slug at the beginning).

    Andy

    https://www.timesavertutorials.com

  • Jeremy Garchow

    October 31, 2012 at 7:28 pm

    It’s sort of different now as you can hold all connected clips in place with a modifier if you’d like.

    Controlling the primary is controlling time in FCPX, and in my professional opinion, you just need to learn the best way to do it. It takes a little while to figure out what’s best for you. At a very basic level, it is still overwrite or insert editing, just like FCP7. When you insert to the primary, time moves, of you don’t, time stands still. Adding connected clips is similar to overwriting to tracks in FCP7.

    Another way would be to set your show close to time in the primary after a gap clip.

    Then compound that gap clip.

    Then open the compound and edit in there. It looks like this, you will see the fixed range of the compound clip:

    fixedtime.png

    When you step back to the Project, your show close will still be in the same position. if you know you’re done, you can break apart the compound.

    Or you can avoid editing in the primary all together if it’s a big deal to you. I, personally, don’t like to work that way, but it is doable.

    Jeremy

  • Don Smith

    October 31, 2012 at 8:10 pm

    I think Jeremy is on to something. Thinking further, start with placing your ending and putting a gap clip between the end of the edit so far and the beginning of the ending. Then CONNECT your next edit to the beginning of the gap clip (or over the tail-end of the last edit of the main show). When you connect the next clip, you may know you can hold the G key and drag the second connected clip up against the first connected clip and they become one secondary storyline where you can roll edits and the like without affecting the timing on the primary storyline. Rinse and Repeat.

    NewsVideo.com

  • Bill Davis

    October 31, 2012 at 10:27 pm

    I’ll go even farther and make a very simple claim.

    There’s nothing you can efficiently edit in a program that doesn’t have “magnetism” that you can’t also edit equally as efficiently in a program like X that does.

    Magnetism got a lot of discussion in the early days of FCP-X because of three things.

    It was different
    It was widely mis-understood
    and it was a very easy place for people who were upset at how different X was – to focus their anger at the stripping away of the value of their prior hard-won expertise.

    The truth about magnetism in a timeline? It’s not really a particularly big deal at all.

    For nearly all editors, it rapidly “disappears” in the sense that it just becomes what you expect. You use it when it helps, and disable it when it conflicts. Kinda like the Caps Lock key.

    No big deal.

    Period.

    Know someone who teaches video editing in elementary school, high school or college? Tell them to check out http://www.StartEditingNow.com – video editing curriculum complete with licensed practice content.

  • Jeremy Garchow

    October 31, 2012 at 11:41 pm

    [Bill Davis] “There’s nothing you can efficiently edit in a program that doesn’t have “magnetism” that you can’t also edit equally as efficiently in a program like X that does.

    Magnetism got a lot of discussion in the early days of FCP-X because of three things.

    It was different
    It was widely mis-understood
    and it was a very easy place for people who were upset at how different X was – to focus their anger at the stripping away of the value of their prior hard-won expertise.

    The truth about magnetism in a timeline? It’s not really a particularly big deal at all.

    For nearly all editors, it rapidly “disappears” in the sense that it just becomes what you expect. You use it when it helps, and disable it when it conflicts. Kinda like the Caps Lock key.

    No big deal.

    Period.”

    You have to admit though, the flexible connections and multichannel audio make things much much better (and easier to manipulate).

    Multichannel audio was a pain in the rear. If you didn’t use multichannel audio, than it wasn’t a pain in the rear.

    Trimming primary clips with connections could also be a pain in the rear if you didn’t do some connection Jiu Jitsu before trimming.

    10.0.6 has made things much more functional in day to day editing.

    Jeremy

  • Bret Williams

    November 1, 2012 at 6:12 am

    I feel the real issue was connected clips. And connected clips are a neccessary evil of magnetism.

    But I’d say that 10.0.6 fixed most of the big problems of connected clips with the addition of flexible clip connections.

  • Don Smith

    November 1, 2012 at 10:23 am

    I really like the magnetic timeline. I now depend on it and it would hurt my brain to back. However, there’s one area that continues to confuse me and that’s moving layers up and down. I sometimes get unexpected results. Yes, I’ll move with the shift key to keep it vertically aligned but still will (sometimes) get unpredictable results. My wish if for a keyboard command where I could hight a clip and, with the keyboard, simply move it up and down among other connected clips.

    What I REALLY want, though, is to understand what’s happening and how to control it but I can’t find an explanation for what the interface is thinking.

    Don

    NewsVideo.com

  • Jeremy Garchow

    November 1, 2012 at 4:09 pm

    [Don Smith] “I sometimes get unexpected results. Yes, I’ll move with the shift key to keep it vertically aligned but still will (sometimes) get unpredictable results. My wish if for a keyboard command where I could hight a clip and, with the keyboard, simply move it up and down among other connected clips.”

    Ditto.

    We also need mechanism to move the selection box via keyboard so that I can select different clips without touching the mouse.

    Jeremy

  • James Ewart

    November 1, 2012 at 4:36 pm

    By which you mean the “override connections” command Brett?

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