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Forums Adobe After Effects How to render 5K from Media Encoder?

  • How to render 5K from Media Encoder?

  • Brian Cheng

    January 20, 2014 at 7:15 pm

    I am making a stop motion video.
    So I put my pictures in AE, and rendered it out into a video file with a size of 5184 x 2912. But when I put the video inside ME, it shrinks the video size to 4096 x 2300. When I try to change the video size back to 5184 x 2912, it said, “Frame dimension not supported. Please check that both width/height values are within limits.”
    help~~~

    $$

  • Todd Kopriva

    January 20, 2014 at 9:12 pm

    What format and codec are you exporting to?

    Also, why such a large output frame size? Where and how do you intend to use this?

    ———————————————————————————————————
    Todd Kopriva, Adobe Systems Incorporated
    After Effects quality engineering
    After Effects team blog
    ———————————————————————————————————

  • Brian Cheng

    January 20, 2014 at 11:09 pm

    H.264 mp4.
    Not intending to do anything, just want to know what is the limit to my video.
    Because I wish no quality is loosed for my video, and doesn’t shrinking from 5K to 4K loss a lot of quality?

    $$

  • Todd Kopriva

    January 20, 2014 at 11:22 pm

    Adobe Media Encoder is enforcing the limits on H.264 video that are imposed by the MPEG-4 specification.

    ———————————————————————————————————
    Todd Kopriva, Adobe Systems Incorporated
    After Effects quality engineering
    After Effects team blog
    ———————————————————————————————————

  • Walter Soyka

    January 21, 2014 at 1:24 am

    [Brian Cheng] “H.264 mp4. Not intending to do anything, just want to know what is the limit to my video. Because I wish no quality is loosed for my video, and doesn’t shrinking from 5K to 4K loss a lot of quality?”

    H.264 is intended to be used as a distribution format (for final playback), not as a mastering or mezzanine format.

    Unless your display is beyond 4K, there’s no practical reason to even try to keep that resolution for your H.264 output. If you’re watching this on an HD monitor, you don’t need any resolution higher than 1920×1080.

    The highest resolution currently supported by the H.264 standard is 4096 x 2304; AME cannot go beyond that resolution and be compliant with the standard, and there is no guarantee that a non-compliant file would be playable.

    H.265 includes support for 8K video, but 8K displays are still a while off.

    You can keep all that glorious resolution in your master file for future-proofing, but you should plan on downscaling for distribution in 2014.

    Walter Soyka
    Principal & Designer at Keen Live
    Motion Graphics, Widescreen Events, Presentation Design, and Consulting
    RenderBreak Blog – What I’m thinking when my workstation’s thinking
    Creative Cow Forum Host: Live & Stage Events

  • Tom Sefton

    January 21, 2014 at 12:01 pm

    If you want to play back at higher than 4k resolution, you will need to cut your workspace into left/right/middle streams. These can be rendered out at up to 4k for each stream, then with synchronised solid state media players you can have ultra high resolutions playing back.

  • Robert England

    December 27, 2015 at 3:59 am

    One definite need for video in excess of 4096 is 3D Virtual reality, to display a 3D SBS 3840×2160 file as Top Bottom (which for now is the only way supported by Youtube VR) woud mean a file that is 1920×4320 going down to 1820×4096, That is a nightmare for a content creators like me… But h265 sounds Promising! I hope it shows up in media encoder! Here is a 3840×2160 3D SBS 360×180 VR video I made and want to (Have To) convert to Top/Bottom to get it to work as a 3D VR Video on Youtube.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RzAvqRchM8A

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