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Forums Apple Final Cut Pro Legacy How to handle 200 Hours of footage?

  • How to handle 200 Hours of footage?

     Shane Ross updated 15 years ago 12 Members · 21 Posts
  • Shane Ross

    May 13, 2007 at 10:58 pm

    Sorry, I’m with Mark. It is the editors job to do the editing, not the producers. I do think it would be wise to have timecoded tapes for the producer to look at so that they know the footage as well, or give them a copy of the footage on a drive for them to look thru, but their job is to write the script and NOT to edit the show. And I am also one to want everything…I want everything. Who knows what hole I need to fill, or what editing challenges I need to surpass that some odd shot would cover. Don’t have the shot, then can’t fix it.

    Capture everything. Look at it all. The producer should have a copy, but they need to be writing. They can even put footage suggestions into the script (which I get all the time), but it is not their job to edit. It is yours.

    Shane

    Littlefrog Post
    http://www.lfhd.net

  • Sean ONeil

    May 14, 2007 at 12:56 am

    [bogiesan] “This is total nonsense and bizarrely ego-centric. First, every second of your footage is not usable and, second, even if every second was perfectly exposed and crucial-to-the-film, you’re not releasing a 200-hour film and, third, even if you were funding the release of a 200-hour epic, no one would watch it for five weeks, and, fourth, do you people think you invented documentary production? How do you think doc producers have been editing beautiful work for the last 100 years?”

    I disagree. Sifting through 200 hours of footage while it’s in linear tape form is in most cases a waste of time for an editor. A student or unskilled person should be hired to ingest everything first, assuming you have time to do it and you have better things to do while its happening (like working on the story, or working on another project). It’s far more efficient to pull selects after its been captured.

    The old school way of doing things (which I’m quite experienced with) existed because capturing 200 hours of footage would have been expensive and impractical (if not impossible) in the past. That’s not the case today. Hard drives are dirt cheap. 200 hours of footage is nothing. I haven’t made a VHS tape for someone in years.

    All that said, I agree with you on her situation. It sounds like a bad idea. Unless she is getting paid well and by the hour, I’d tell the director and producer to do the monkey work themselves or find someone else to do it.

    Sean

  • Sean ONeil

    May 14, 2007 at 1:08 am

    Misha. This is my storage reccomendation.

    Go to Newegg.com. They sell 400GB Seagate SATA disks for $95 each. 2.5TB would be about $600. If you are fortunate enough to have a Mac Pro, you can fit 3 drives internally.

    If not, get multiple SATA external enclosures. There are ones at Newegg for less than $50 each, and some have the added benefit of a USB 2.0 port in addition to a SATA port (so the director can plug it in and review footage). These are practically passive devices so

    You don’t need RAID0. A single 7200RPM disk is more than fast enough for multiple streams of DV and DV50. Get a SATA card, and you’re looking at less than $1000 total. But you might want RAID1 protection given the volume of footage you have to deal with, which will of course double your cost.

    Sean

  • Sean ONeil

    May 14, 2007 at 1:15 am

    I didn’t finish a thought there. What I meant was these cheapo no-brand-name external enclosures are almost passive devices. You don’t need to be concerned with quality. They perform a very basic task, so don’t worry about being a cheapskate when choosing one.

    Sean

  • Misha Mazor

    May 14, 2007 at 9:16 am

    Thanks all for your input,

    So I’m pitching the director to buy the MacGurus Burly 8 Bay 6TB SATA Raid solution ($3365)+SATA PCIx Card ($288), and four 1TB Fantom G-Force drives for back-up ($1500).

    Thats seems like a relatively easy $5200 for full, unencumbered access to a ton of footage.

    Thanks again,
    Misha

  • Misha Mazor

    May 14, 2007 at 9:20 am

    “An external SATA would be best. I’d not bother working in a lower res, and I’d also capture the DV footage as DVCPRO50…”

    Why would I want to do that–to avoid rendering DV footage in a DV50 sequence? That would double my overall storage requirement–up to 8TB!

    How would I uprez DV footage to DV50 on the fly anyways?

    Thanks,
    Misha

  • walter biscardi

    May 14, 2007 at 10:26 am

    [Misha Mazor] “four 1TB Fantom G-Force drives for back-up ($1500).”

    You can purchase 2 LaCie 2TB triple interface units for about the same price. I would prefer to use two drives daisy chained rather than four for backup. Just me though.

    Walter Biscardi, Jr.
    https://www.biscardicreative.com
    HD Editorial & Animation for Broadcast and independent productions.

    All Things Apple Podcast! https://cowcast.creativecow.net/all_things_apple/index.html

    Read my blog! https://blogs.creativecow.net/WalterBiscardi

  • walter biscardi

    May 14, 2007 at 10:31 am

    [john buck] “please explain to your director that by virtue of DV recording in its own codec the material is already digitally stored- on those camera tapes.”

    What does this mean? All formats of tape are digitally stored unless they’re an older analog format. Tapes still need to be digitized into the system and in this case with the mix of DV and DV50 footage, I would opt to capture everything to the DV50 codec.

    The format the footage is shot on really doesn’t dictate the Post workflow, especially when working with boards such as the AJA Kona 3 which can convert footage to just about anything.

    Walter Biscardi, Jr.
    https://www.biscardicreative.com
    HD Editorial & Animation for Broadcast and independent productions.

    All Things Apple Podcast! https://cowcast.creativecow.net/all_things_apple/index.html

    Read my blog! https://blogs.creativecow.net/WalterBiscardi

  • Ron James

    May 14, 2007 at 6:06 pm

    [walter biscardi] “You can purchase 2 LaCie 2TB triple interface units for about the same price. I would prefer to use two drives daisy chained rather than four for backup. Just me though.”

    I agree. Less devices in the chain and MUCH less clutter.

  • Andrew Kimery

    May 14, 2007 at 9:32 pm

    I agree w/Shane and Mark. What looks like garbage at first glance could be a scene saving “happy accident” down the road. I remember a story Stu Maschwitz told about a commercial he directed (link below) where his editor “found” a needed reaction shot of the male actor at after a take, but before the camera was stopped. Stu said if he’d been editing he never would’ve seen it because he wouldn’t have captured the “garbage” after the takes.

    https://theorphanage.com/ocp/?q=portfolio/brand/1073/1025

    -Andrew

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