Creative Communities of the World Forums

The peer to peer support community for media production professionals.

Forums Adobe After Effects GTX Titan in After Effects CS6 (OS X 10.8.3)

  • GTX Titan in After Effects CS6 (OS X 10.8.3)

  • Zeno Costa

    June 2, 2013 at 10:52 pm

    GTX Titan Superclocked now running in OS X 10.8.3 using the latest NVIDIA Web Driver (313.01.01f03) and CUDA Driver Version 5.0.59.

    I’ve modified the “raytracer_supported_cards.txt” file for After Effects CS 6 (11.0.2) to include the “GeForce GTX TITAN.” However, After Effects reports the following error when starting up:

    After Effects error: Ray-traced 3D: Initial shader compile failed (5070 :: 0)

    Mylenium discusses the error in detail here:

    https://myleniumerrors.com/2013/01/06/5070-0-3/

    Removing “GeForce GTX TITAN” from the “raytracer_supported_cards.txt” file resolves the error message, however, this obviously renders the Titan useless for any ray-traced GPU acceleration within After Effects. Moreover, as expected, the “Ray-Traced 3D” renderer option is not available once After Effects has loaded.

    Any thoughts on why After Effects is reporting this error and what the solution might be?

    One final note, even with the startup error, After Effects successfully reports the GTX Titan under GPU Information (see attached image below), although again, the “Ray-Traced 3D” renderer option is not available.

  • Todd Kopriva

    June 3, 2013 at 1:52 am

    I’ll give you the same answer here to this question that I gave in the other place where you asked:

    That card is not one of the cards that After Effects will use for GPU acceleration of the ray-traced 3D renderer. By modifying that text file, you have put your system into an unsupported state.

    See this page for details of GPU features in After Effects:

    https://blogs.adobe.com/aftereffects/2012/05/gpu-cuda-opengl-features-in-after-effects-cs6.html

    ———————————————————————————————————
    Todd Kopriva, Adobe Systems Incorporated
    After Effects quality engineering
    After Effects team blog
    ———————————————————————————————————

  • Jason Jantzen

    June 3, 2013 at 3:45 pm

    Couldn’t the AE team try to keep up a little better on newly released cards and send out updates for them? I have a cloud membership and would assume WITH that, like Photoshop has updates to support newer/more camera models, etc, that AE would receive updates for newly released hardware.

    Jason Jantzen
    vimeo.com/jasonj

  • Todd Kopriva

    June 3, 2013 at 4:03 pm

    We test and support specific hardware as we get requests for each card. We have gotten very few requests for this card so far.

    You can make a request here:
    https://www.adobe.com/go/wish

    ———————————————————————————————————
    Todd Kopriva, Adobe Systems Incorporated
    After Effects quality engineering
    After Effects team blog
    ———————————————————————————————————

  • Zeno Costa

    June 7, 2013 at 5:27 am

    No disrespect Todd, but limiting GPU support to only “user requests” is an inane policy, especially considering how much of the current Creative Suite/CC production software is dependent upon GPU acceleration.

    I expect much more from a company like Adobe.

  • Todd Kopriva

    June 7, 2013 at 5:55 am

    Only one feature of After Effects is dependent on the GPU acceleration under discussion here. See this page for details, especially the “Important” note:
    https://blogs.adobe.com/aftereffects/2012/05/gpu-cuda-opengl-features-in-after-effects-cs6.html

    It is not a significant feature to have this acceleration; yet the testing involved for each card is significant.

    ———————————————————————————————————
    Todd Kopriva, Adobe Systems Incorporated
    After Effects quality engineering
    After Effects team blog
    ———————————————————————————————————

  • Zeno Costa

    June 7, 2013 at 6:29 am

    That “one feature” discussed in the “Important Note” is actually quite significant.

    One of the most significant features released in After Effects CS6 was the Ray-Traced 3D renderer. And that is what the GPU accelerates with CUDA. Without CUDA acceleration, After Effects CS6’s Ray-Traced 3D renderer’s performance is nearly crippled, relying entirely on the CPU.

    For reference of GPU vs. CPU ray-tracing performance, view the Radeon HD 5870’s benchmark (i.e. a non-CUDA, CPU Ray-Traced 3D benchmark) under the After Effects CS6 benchmark results at Bare Feats:

    https://www.barefeats.com/gpu680v2.html

    The CPU-based render is nearly 1100% slower than the slowest CUDA card tested and the render failed to complete!!

    Moreover, the subject of this thread is related to the Ray-Traced 3D renderer, which is supported by numerous NVIDIA GPUs, including the GTX 780 which was very recently released (see link below).

    https://forums.creativecow.net/thread/2/1038010#1038026

    It is extremely aggravating to see the GTX 780 “unofficially” supported in After Effects, but not the GTX Titan which shares the same GK110 GPU and has been retailing for a significantly longer period.

    Also, I can appreciate that the testing for this acceleration is rigorous; perhaps there is a compromise where After Effects can “unofficially” support any CUDA card similarly to Premiere Pro CC.

    https://blogs.adobe.com/premierepro/2013/05/improved-gpu-support-in-adobe-premiere-pro-cc.html

    “Also, if you own a GPU that we haven’t officially tested, but which meets the minimum requirement of having 1GB of VRAM and appropriate drivers installed, you will be able to enable that GPU in Playback Settings. An alert warns you that your configuration isn’t officially certified, but you’ll still be able to turn it on to use it. All this means that more people than ever will be able to enjoy full, GPU-enhanced Mercury Playback Engine performance.”

  • Todd Kopriva

    June 7, 2013 at 2:46 pm

    > Also, I can appreciate that the testing for this acceleration is rigorous; perhaps there is a compromise where Adobe can “unofficially” support any CUDA card similarly to Premiere Pro CC.

    We are working on that right now.

    ———————————————————————————————————
    Todd Kopriva, Adobe Systems Incorporated
    After Effects quality engineering
    After Effects team blog
    ———————————————————————————————————

  • Jean-Marie Belloteau

    June 18, 2013 at 6:09 pm

    Hello,

    We have 2 GTX Titan in a PCIe expender for our Mac OSX station. We use them for DaVinci Resolve and it’s work like a charm! It’s so sad that we can’t use them on Premiere or After Effect as Adobe software use CUDA like DaVinci and many other soft.
    We just get creative cloud in my company and we loved to use the power of GTX Titan with Premiere and After Effects to help us with huge tiff file sequence render.

    I hope Adobe guys still here and will you heard my bad frenchy English! 🙂

    Thanks a lot

    Jim


    Jim Belloteau

    Co-founder of Immersion Pictures
    Head of Picture Department
    https://www.immersion-pictures.com

  • Jason Jantzen

    June 18, 2013 at 6:12 pm

    You can definitely use those cards in Premiere. Look under Project>Project Settings>General… And I think there is an option in there for you to chose unsupported cards.

    Jason Jantzen
    vimeo.com/jasonj

Viewing 1 - 10 of 23 posts

Log in to reply.

We use anonymous cookies to give you the best experience we can.
Our Privacy policy | GDPR Policy