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Forums Apple Final Cut Pro Legacy FCP7 Projects as Archives – what now?

  • FCP7 Projects as Archives – what now?

  • Bob Cole

    November 1, 2017 at 6:55 pm

    I get it: FCP7 is going away at last.

    But very often I have to open up an old FCP7 project simply as a means of tapping my archive of old graphics and clips. When a client asks about an old show and wants to use an element in a new edit, being able to open FCP7 is a great way to identify it. (“What was the name of that music cue?” “Where is that sound bite?” etc.)

    In short, even after FCP7 won’t work as an active editing program, it will still be have great value as an index and an archive.

    Has anyone developed a program to translate FCP7 projects into another program which will still be supported in the post-Sierra OS’s?

    Thanks.

    Bob C

  • Michael Gissing

    November 2, 2017 at 12:08 am

    You can export xmls that can be opened in Premiere or Resolve. You will lose things like grades, plugins etc but you should be able to open old FCP7 projects to look at media. Of course if a project has multiple timelines you will need an xml for each timeline and you will also lose things like bin structures.

    Or you can keep a disk partition/ dual boot with an older OS and FCP7 installed.

  • Shane Ross

    November 2, 2017 at 12:55 am

    I have an old 2008 MacPro running 10.6.8 around for just this purpose. That, and it connects to a 16TB Raid that won’t connect to a new machine…old connection. So I keep this around. Best thing to do if you need to open older projects or deal with older media, keep an older machine

    Shane
    Little Frog Post
    Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def

  • Nick Meyers

    November 2, 2017 at 1:05 am

    [Shane Ross] “That, and it connects to a 16TB Raid that won’t connect to a new machine..”

    intersting, Shane…
    so do you use the MacPro as a server of sorts?
    I’m thinking of something similar myself

    nick

  • Shane Ross

    November 2, 2017 at 6:43 am

    Yes, but mainly as archival now. Show masters, camera offloads. Although I have camera cards also backed up on separate external drives, and show masters archive on separate drives with full project consolidations, it’s nice to have these here and easily accessable.

    Shane
    Little Frog Post
    Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def

  • Nick Meyers

    November 2, 2017 at 10:28 am

    ah yes, i see, makes sense
    I’ve got increasing collection of those sorts of things myself…
    but not 16TB worth!

    thanks,
    nick

  • Shane Ross

    November 2, 2017 at 6:34 pm

    Yeah, that ONE RAID is 16TB. And I still have lots of other FW drives, including the very FIRST FW400 drives I bought to use with FCP 2.

    Shane
    Little Frog Post
    Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def

  • Bob Cole

    November 2, 2017 at 7:09 pm

    Great points. Sure, .xml is a help, and holding onto an old Mac is a smart idea. But there are a couple of problems.

    1. For an archive, keeping the bin structure is important.
    2. I have hundreds of FCP projects, and analyzing them to guess which ones will be useful would take more time than it’s worth. I doubt that I will have the time to export and organize .xml’s of every single timeline, especially as I edit in a timeline-intensive way.
    3. Keeping an old machine running is problematic.

    So… I’m still greedy for a FCP7 file translation program. With the huge installed base of FCP7, it seems to me that somebody could create a translation program which preserves the timelines and bins, if not the more esoteric details like filters.

    Bob C

  • Michael Gissing

    November 2, 2017 at 10:55 pm

    [Bob Cole] “So… I’m still greedy for a FCP7 file translation program.”

    Hard to imagine that keeping an old computer which also reads the old firewire drives is going to be more expensive that custom software. I don’t know of any translation software that is quite what you want. And given most either have an old machine, dual boot or convert to xml, the demand might be much smaller than you think.

  • John Rofrano

    November 4, 2017 at 2:26 am

    You don’t even need an old machine. All you need is a separate partition. I have a Snow Leopard partition that I can boot into to work with DVD Studio Pro 4 when needed. At that point the whole computer is Snow Leopard again. Just keep a boot drive around. It can even be on an external USB drive or thumb drive. If you still need Firewire there is a Thunderbolt to Firewire adapter you can buy from Apple for $29. The Mac makes it so easy to boot into an older OS X version when needed.

    ~jr

    http://www.johnrofrano.com
    http://www.vasstsoftware.com

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