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Forums Adobe Premiere Pro Editing H.264 files in Premiere

  • Editing H.264 files in Premiere

     Sunderland Green updated 4 years ago 4 Members · 10 Posts
  • Rachel Bradshaw

    February 6, 2017 at 8:39 pm

    Hello,

    I am Importing H.264, Linear PCM Quicktimes files that are dropping in playback in Adobe Premiere.
    Can I convert them to a better codec? I thought Premiere takes all native files.

    Thank you so much,

    Rachel

  • Rachel Bradshaw

    February 7, 2017 at 12:44 am

    The video is an 4GB 1920 x 1080 HD Quicktime movie file. I am editing off of a Seagate Go Flex 500 GB external drive connected to my MACBOOK 13 inch Mid 2010 Processor 2.4 GHZ Intel Core 2 Duo. OS X Yosemite Version 10.10.5

  • Rachel Bradshaw

    February 7, 2017 at 1:05 am

    “Internal Hard Drive” meaning onto the computer like for instance the desktop?

  • andy patterson

    February 7, 2017 at 3:49 am

    [Rachel Bradshaw] “The video is an 4GB 1920 x 1080 HD Quicktime movie file. I am editing off of a Seagate Go Flex 500 GB external drive connected to my MACBOOK 13 inch Mid 2010 Processor 2.4 GHZ Intel Core 2 Duo. OS X Yosemite Version 10.10.5”

    A cheap $600.00 Dell or HP would be better than that out dated Macbook. Having said that the hard drive will be fast enough to play several layers of AVCHD at 1920 X 1080. If you convert to Pro Res it might be to slow to play even one layer of Pro Res.

  • andy patterson

    February 7, 2017 at 3:53 am

    [Dave LaRonde] “It sounds like the connection to the external hard drive. Unless it’s Thunderbolt, I doubt it’s fast enough to keep up with the bit rate of your file. Try copying the file to the internal drive to see if you get smooth playback.”

    The external hard drive will be fast enough to play several layers of AVCHD at 1920 X 1080. If you convert to Pro Res it might be to slow to play even one layer of Pro Res. Unless the laptop has a SSD it will probably be slower than the external hard drive.

  • Chris Wright

    February 7, 2017 at 4:15 am

    I pulled your data into this playback matrix.
    Seagate FreeAgent GoFlex Large files were written at 104.6MB/s and read at 114.3MB similar to a WD, so….
    assuming your video clip is not shorter than 40 seconds(i.e.or 1 sec long at 4GB), we can deduce that its not your hard drive.

    if we assume the above, according to your specs, the only thing stopping you is your CPU.
    broken down as: mac 2.4ghz score:1545 compared to I-7 score: 14,502 roughly 9x slower which is exponential so more like 30x slower.

    https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/articles/Adobe-Premiere-Pro-CC-2015-4-Storage-Optimization-854/#Conclusion

    solution:
    1. drop playback res to 1/2 or 1/4
    2. you can either render to a sub- 100mb/sec codec full offline or take advantage of premiere’s new proxy function. (prores proxy)
    https://helpx.adobe.com/premiere-pro/kb/ingest-proxy-workflow-premiere-pro-cc-2015.html

    some other methods of getting smooth playback:
    1. mac os 10.12.3 video patch
    2. add premiere in NVidia Control Panel as an application for discrete gpu
    3. Make Sure The Composite Preview During Trim is Turned Off and also make sure your Reference Monitor is Also Closed it Will Help Solve the Choppy Playback
    4. toggling off the High Dynamic Range setting and LUT’s in the setting menu of the Lumetri Color panel improves gpu
    5. disable “High Quality Playback” setting in the monitor wrench menu improves gpu
    6. disable mercury transmit
    7. freezing up on mac permission issue
    https://blogs.adobe.com/kevinmonahan/2014/09/10/premiere-pro-cc-freezing-on-...
    8. in monitor, pull markers together so there’s less tick marks per inch, the playback marker will go offscreen while playing back.
    9. disable sequence composite linear color

  • Rachel Bradshaw

    February 7, 2017 at 5:12 am

    Lowering the playback resolution to 1/4 seems to have worked. Thank you.

    Is it time for a new MAC/

  • andy patterson

    February 7, 2017 at 5:50 am

    [Rachel Bradshaw] “Lowering the playback resolution to 1/4 seems to have worked. Thank you.”

    I thought you had tried that. My bad. I knew it was not the hard drive.

  • Sunderland Green

    April 5, 2017 at 8:35 am

    H.264 is a inter-frame delivery formats, although Premiere Pro CC has native editing support for it, however, if you try to directly edit H.264 with PPC, there will a lot of problems listed as below, therefore, it would be much ideal for you to encode H.264 to Premiere Pro CC supported intra-frame editing formats such as Prores or DV format.
    – Slow searching for and decoding of frames
    – Frame-accuracy problems
    – Crashing or freezing
    – Strange artifacts or blocking on your video
    – Error messages or displaying black video

  • Sunderland Green

    December 4, 2017 at 9:02 am

    Editing H.264 natively will help users to save the extra decoding time and HDD space. However, when taking other factors such as render time, image quality, computer hardware costs or integration with other video formats in the same project, a lot of people may find H.264 is not the best choice in the following aspects:
    – H.264 is an extremely processor intensive codec, it is so compressed that your computer’s cpu is having to decode it on the fly, which is a big burden.
    – It takes longer time to render H.264 files than other formats.
    – H.264 is an 8-bit format, which means that you are potentially compromising your effects and, especially, color correction and compositing with gradients.
    – H.264 does not integrate easily with other video formats.

    To fix all the head-scratching issue caused by H.264 editing format, here we highly recommend you to transcode H.264 to Premiere Pro CC’s high quality and high performance editing codec – Apple Prores.

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