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  • DCP compliant audio using RX Loudness Control

     Dan Gelter updated 4 years, 3 months ago 3 Members · 3 Posts
  • Anmol Mishra

    March 12, 2018 at 3:43 pm

    Hi. RX Loudness control has a number of presets related to TV broadcast. Could someone kindly provide a preset or a guide to mix audio to Leq(m) levels between 74-79, as required for DCP compliance?

  • Ty Ford

    March 13, 2018 at 12:48 am

    Hello Anmol and welcome to the Cow Audio Forum.

    The preset you choose depends on which TV system(s) you’ll be sending your program to. You may need more than one!

    https://www.izotope.com/en/community/blog/tips-tutorials/2015/05/using-rx-loudness-control-within-adobe-premiere-pro-cc.html

    Regards,

    Ty Ford
    Cow Audio Forum Leader

    Want better production audio?: Ty Ford\’s Audio Bootcamp Field Guide
    Ty Ford Blog: Ty Ford\’s Blog

  • Dan Gelter

    March 18, 2018 at 12:57 pm

    As answered on GS, there’s no (real) loudness spec for audio in a movie theatre.
    But to get you in the ballpark, and to quote Georgia:
    “Get the dialogue to around -12 for yelling with a bit higher for the occasional scream, and down to -22ish -20 for speaking, down to -23 (and lower) for whispers.
    Big crashes / hits/ explosions can tap 0. Quiet ambience can get all the way down to -28 ish or lower”

    But again, these numbers are not a spec. They’re based on personal taste, with a certain type of film in mind, and should be measured ‘True-peak’.
    Also know that theatres have a so called ‘X Curve’ on their sound-system, meaning both low & high frequencies are rolled off to a certain degree, but not equally on every level. When mixing you can compensate for that X-curve.

    Another thing to keep in mind: when mixing over nearfield monitors, it’s difficult to create a dynamic sounding mix, and quite impossible to mix low frequencies.
    It’s best to do a test run in a local theatre (or calibrated dub stage) before signing off on a project.

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