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Activity Forums Adobe Premiere Pro Buying Premiere Pro Without Subscription

  • Buying Premiere Pro Without Subscription

    Posted by Bobby Hall on March 1, 2016 at 8:25 am

    Is it possible to buy Premiere Pro from Adobe without paying for a subscription service? I prefer to just buy the program in one large payment instead of paying a monthly fee.

    If you can’t buy the latest version of the program outright, is it worth it to buy an earlier version of the program? And would it work well on a current MacBook Pro running Yosemite?

    I edit using FCP 7 and was thinking about getting FCP X, but then I heard that you don’t have to transcode any files before importing them in Premiere (like h.264 .mp4 files) and so I was considering switching to Premiere. Thanks for any help!

    Chris Evans replied 8 years, 4 months ago 7 Members · 11 Replies
  • 11 Replies
  • Tero Ahlfors

    March 1, 2016 at 9:04 am

    You can buy CS6 but it’s pretty outdated by now. The newer applications are subscription only.

  • Chris Evans

    March 1, 2016 at 3:24 pm

    Unfortunately, you cannot buy Premiere Pro CC. I believe you can pay by the year if you’d rather do that though. I understand the hesitation in effectively renting software instead of buying it, but it’s the only option we’ve got. FCP 7 and CS6 are both pretty old at this point and will only become more and more outdated as time goes on. I think it’s worth the investment to go for CC, but you may want to consider FCP X if you dont’ want to pay monthly, it’s cheaper anyway and it’s good. Premiere and FCP X are both good and when you take the time to learn one, you’ll use it just fine. Compare the pros and cons and pick one, there will be things you don’t like and things you do, but you’ll work in either one just fine.

  • Shane Ross

    March 1, 2016 at 4:55 pm

    BTW, you can edit H.264 in FCX without transcoding too. AND…you can start editing and have it “optimize” (transcode to ProRes) in the background and connect to that and you won’t even know it.

    Not that I’m a HUGE advocate of FCX….just saying…

    Shane
    Little Frog Post
    Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def

  • Bobby Hall

    March 1, 2016 at 10:04 pm

    Thanks guys. I know this is off topic, but what are your thoughts on Avid? Do you prefer it over all the others? And is it worth it to buy the program instead of paying for for it on a monthly or yearly basis?

  • Shane Ross

    March 2, 2016 at 12:17 am

    Avid is great under certain conditions. Multi-editor shared project workflows. Feature film workflows. Any time you need to plug into an existing workflow chain where Avid is a main component. And offline/online workflows. Great if your computer isn’t top of the line and you don’t have tons of RAM. Because it converts footage to Avid media and takes little computing power to deal with. Drawback…you need to convert the footage.

    Premiere…if you cut native…requires fast fast processors, lots of RAM, and a kick ass graphics card. It’s not so hot on the offline/online workflow…it’ll do it, but not nearly as slick as Avid. BUT, if you want to work native, and have lots of drive space…it’s a way to go.

    FCX…you can work native or convert. It has a balance between kick ass computer specs and being able to work with what you have. But also VERY different than working with Avid or Premiere or FCP in terms of how editing works.

    Shane
    Little Frog Post
    Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def

  • Jim Watt

    March 2, 2016 at 12:19 am

    Can also try Resolve 12. They’ve added editing features that work pretty well. Not as elegant as Premier Pro CC, but I edited an hour program with it recently and it worked fine.

    Jim Watt

  • Bobby Hall

    March 2, 2016 at 12:21 am

    Thanks a lot Shane!

  • Andrew Kimery

    March 2, 2016 at 1:31 am

    [Shane Ross] “Premiere…if you cut native…requires fast fast processors, lots of RAM, and a kick ass graphics card. It’s not so hot on the offline/online workflow…it’ll do it, but not nearly as slick as Avid. BUT, if you want to work native, and have lots of drive space…it’s a way to go.”

    It depends on what the native footage is and how much of a performance hit you find objectionable. I edit camera native footage (HD, not UHD) with ’09 MacPro and 2011 MacBookPro in PPro and I find the performance acceptable. The GPU in the MacPro was middle of the road 2-3yrs ago and, at leasts in the tests I’ve done, I can pull a couple of streams of 4K RED clips with a key and CC just fine if I drop it down to 1/4 res playback (which means I’m ‘only’ looking at 1080p).

    [Shane Ross] “FCX…you can work native or convert. It has a balance between kick ass computer specs and being able to work with what you have. “

    I’ve only kicked around with X a tiny bit, but from what I’ve heard it really, really wants to be on newer hardware. I think PPro and Avid probably run better on older Macs than FCP X does.

  • Steve Connor

    March 2, 2016 at 1:59 pm

    [Andrew Kimery] “I’ve only kicked around with X a tiny bit, but from what I’ve heard it really, really wants to be on newer hardware. I think PPro and Avid probably run better on older Macs than FCP X does.”

    I run it quite happily on a 2008 Mac Pro with a Radeon 7950 card. It’s not as fast as newer systems but it works well, even in 4K

  • Andrew Kimery

    March 2, 2016 at 5:09 pm

    [Steve Connor]
    I run it quite happily on a 2008 Mac Pro with a Radeon 7950 card. It’s not as fast as newer systems but it works well, even in 4K”

    That gives me hope that it will run adequately on my on 2009 MP. No slowness to the UI or anything like that?

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