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  • Best Image Format for PreRenders

  • Mark Walczak

    February 26, 2010 at 9:53 pm

    Hi everyone,

    I was just wondering if anyone found a good file format for prerenders. Does it take longer for AE to render prerendered TIFFs as opposed to MOVs, etc?

    Just wondering.

    Thanks

  • Mark Walczak

    February 26, 2010 at 10:56 pm

    Cool. Just didn’t know if anyone noticed a difference.

    I ABSOLUTELY agree that lossless is the way to go – thanks, Dave!

    https://vimeo.com/explosivegraffix

  • Joey Foreman

    February 27, 2010 at 12:50 am

    Dave, doesn’t Animation support 32 bits per channel?

  • Todd Kopriva

    February 27, 2010 at 2:23 am

    > Dave, doesn’t Animation support 32 bits per channel?

    Nope. Animation is an 8bpc codec.

    Very, very few codecs can create 32bpc files. Animation does create images at 32 bits per _pixel_, with 8bpc for each of R, G, B, and A.

    ———————————————————————————————————
    Todd Kopriva, Adobe Systems Incorporated
    putting the ‘T’ back in ‘RTFM’ : After Effects Help on the Web
    ———————————————————————————————————
    If a page of After Effects Help answers your question, please consider rating it. If you have a tip, technique, or link to share—or if there is something that you’d like to see added or improved—please leave a comment.

  • Todd Kopriva

    February 27, 2010 at 2:29 am

    BTW, regarding the question of “taking longer to render TIFFs versus MOVs”:

    The rendering step is the same for both of these. The export/encode step is what’s different—and that’s not the part that takes much time.

    (Keep in mind that there are two steps to creating output from After Effects: rendering and exporting, where exporting includes encoding. Render settings dictate the former; output module settings dictate the latter.)

    There are many benefits to creating image sequences instead of movie files. One benefit is that you can split up the render operation among computers more easily with image sequences. Another reason is that a render that fails near the end leaves you with a lot of good frames—up to the one that failed—if you’re outputting images; if you’re creating a MOV file, you have to start over.

    ———————————————————————————————————
    Todd Kopriva, Adobe Systems Incorporated
    putting the ‘T’ back in ‘RTFM’ : After Effects Help on the Web
    ———————————————————————————————————
    If a page of After Effects Help answers your question, please consider rating it. If you have a tip, technique, or link to share—or if there is something that you’d like to see added or improved—please leave a comment.

  • Joey Foreman

    February 27, 2010 at 3:09 am

    Ugh, back to the white papers.

    So, if I want to pre-render my floating-point layer in my 32 bpc comp, I should use a Tiff Sequence or…
    Radiance, OpenEXR…?

  • Todd Kopriva

    February 27, 2010 at 3:15 am

    I’m a fan of OpenEXR.

    ———————————————————————————————————
    Todd Kopriva, Adobe Systems Incorporated
    putting the ‘T’ back in ‘RTFM’ : After Effects Help on the Web
    ———————————————————————————————————
    If a page of After Effects Help answers your question, please consider rating it. If you have a tip, technique, or link to share—or if there is something that you’d like to see added or improved—please leave a comment.

  • Joey Foreman

    February 27, 2010 at 3:17 am

    Cool. Thanks for the enlightenment, Todd.

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