Creative Communities of the World Forums

The peer to peer support community for media production professionals.

Activity Forums Adobe Premiere Pro Audio Keyframes…adding and adjusting.

  • Audio Keyframes…adding and adjusting.

    Posted by Shane Ross on May 29, 2014 at 2:08 am

    Premiere Pro CC 7.1…how can I add a keyframe to an audio clip on the timeline with a keyboard shortcut? Can I? I search shortcuts and cannot find a way to do this. Gotta use the mouse.

    How can I adjust multiple keyframes at the same time, across multiple audio tracks? I’ve tried everything. Can I?

    Reasoning…I want to dip the audio on multiple sources at once. Start at full volume, and then dip all down under VO, or other soundbite. So far it’s VERY cumbersome…keyframe each track separately…adjust each frame separately…and mousing ALL the way.

    Shane
    Little Frog Post
    Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def

    Alex Udell replied 9 years, 10 months ago 3 Members · 9 Replies
  • 9 Replies
  • Ivan Myles

    May 29, 2014 at 12:59 pm

    Link the tracks to an audio submix track and keyframe the submix.

  • Shane Ross

    May 29, 2014 at 3:58 pm

    That seems like a lot of work just to dip the audio. First, make a submix. Then, in the mixer, patch all the tracks you want to that submix. Then, add the keyframes…with a mouse…and drag down…with a mouse. That’s a lot of clicking.

    In Avid I highlight the tracks I want, press a key…that adds a keyframe to all tracks at once. move to position 2…add another keyframe. Lasso, drag or use keyboard to lower audio. Done. Takes seconds. No going to the mixer, patching audio to a submix. Seems very cumbersome to me.

    FCP was just as easy, if not easier. Because I could use keyboard shortcuts to do 3db adjustments, rather than the 1db Avid does.

    Because I am constantly adjusting audio on the timeline to raise music, adjust levels on SFX…raise B-roll audio or narration or interview…needing to patch to a submix for multiple tracks constantly…and doing all this with a mouse only (Seriously…I cannot add a keyframe with a keystroke…MOUSE ONLY…pain).

    Looks like I need to submit a feature request.

    Shane
    Little Frog Post
    Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def

  • Alex Udell

    May 29, 2014 at 6:11 pm

    How about add the changes to one

    copy and paste attributes to multi-selected others.

    a lot of that can be done with the keys.

    that at least will get you the same basic curves on all the clips quickly.

    remember too, use the arrow tool and grab the segments between points us useful so you don’t have to dink around with points at each end of a change.

    not exactly what you are looking for….hopefully helpful.

    Alex Udell
    Editing, Motion Graphics, and Visual FX

  • Shane Ross

    May 29, 2014 at 6:14 pm

    Alex…that is a brilliant idea! Nice one…You can copy and paste attributes now, like you could with FCP.

    Kudos

    Shane
    Little Frog Post
    Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def

  • Alex Udell

    May 29, 2014 at 6:21 pm

    cool!

    🙂

    Alex Udell
    Editing, Motion Graphics, and Visual FX

  • Ivan Myles

    May 29, 2014 at 11:55 pm

    [Alex Udell] “copy and paste attributes to multi-selected others.”

    Don’t all the clips need to start on the same frame for the keyframes to be sync’d?

  • Ivan Myles

    May 29, 2014 at 11:59 pm

    [Shane Ross] “That seems like a lot of work just to dip the audio.”

    Only takes a few seconds in the Audio Mixer Panel to set it up. The primary advantage is the ability to make changes while editing without having to go back to each clip.

    It’s just a suggestion; do what works best for your workflow. 🙂

  • Shane Ross

    May 30, 2014 at 12:18 am

    Yeah…I like that idea. I need to play around more with it. Get to know how to mix in Premiere.

    Thanks

    Shane
    Little Frog Post
    Read my blog, Little Frog in High Def

  • Alex Udell

    May 30, 2014 at 5:42 pm

    I like it to. there is some real nice things about that approach.

    one thing though….is that it’s track based, right? which means keyframes don’t ripple…or at least it used to mean that….

    You’re be right about the alignment of the keyframes in my techninique I didn’t think about that.

    however, you could quick razor, across the clips to assure a common start point…then if necessary…join edits after the paste….

    Alex Udell
    Editing, Motion Graphics, and Visual FX

We use anonymous cookies to give you the best experience we can.
Our Privacy policy | GDPR Policy