Creative Communities of the World Forums

The peer to peer support community for media production professionals.

Forums Business & Career Building A Major Motion Picture in HDV

  • A Major Motion Picture in HDV

  • Dan Asselin

    April 16, 2009 at 5:19 pm

    So I see in the news portion of the Cow Main Page that the movie “Crank – High Voltage” was filmed primarily using the Canon
    XHA1 and the Canon VixiaHF10. (I was thinking that the next sentence was going to be that they edited it using Adobe Premier Elements but there was no mention of their NLE)

    The reason I am writing this in the business forum is I want to ask people the following question. Have standards fallen so low that it makes no sense to even spend the money to go “all the way up” to a
    full 1920×1080 camera instead of HDV.

    I guess that I am more sensitive to this because I am in the process of buying my first “real” camcorder and, like everyone else, don’t want to feel like a dummy afterwards.

    I know there isn’t really an answer here but perhaps this is a development which merits some discussion.

    Thanks All;

    Dan

  • David Roth Weiss

    April 16, 2009 at 5:29 pm

    [Dan Asselin] “Have standards fallen so low that it makes no sense to even spend the money to go “all the way up” to a full 1920×1080 camera instead of HDV. “

    Dan,

    There are of course just as many articles out there detailing projects shot on RED and Genesis at 4K as well, and there are all kinds of projects shot on everything in between HDV and 4K too.

    The look you want to achieve, the budget you’re working with, the market you’re in, and most importantly, the story you’re trying to tell, should all be considered as the primary factors in camera selection, and renting rather than owning isn’t all bad either.

    David Roth Weiss
    Director/Editor
    David Weiss Productions, Inc.
    Los Angeles

    POST-PRODUCTION WITHOUT THE USUAL INSANITY ™

    A forum host of Creative COW’s Apple Final Cut Pro, Business & Marketing, and Indie Film & Documentary forums.

  • jon agnew

    April 16, 2009 at 5:43 pm

    I think it is sometime all too easy for us to fall into the technology trap, giving too much weight to numbers…1440 x 1080 or 1920 x 1080….4:2:0 vs 4:2:2…etc. I am more than guilty of this. However, I think it’s important for us to remember that, at its core, filmmaking is about story and emotion…and that cannot be quantified with resolution or color space.

    One of my favorite movies from the last 5 years is “The Puffy Chair” shot entirely on a DVX-100. It may not look like “The Last Emperor”, but the story was successful…and because it cost so little to make, it was a financial success as well. And it opened the door for the Duplass Brothers, who wrote and directed the film, to make more films…which, in the end, is how a filmmaker would judge his own success: “Can I make another one?”

    I think it’s laudable for filmmakers to pursue their craft despite limitations imposed by budget and format. I would rather see a good story shot on VHS, than a Michael Bay film in IMAX.

  • Trey Gregory

    April 16, 2009 at 5:59 pm

    I feel like the barriers to entry are dropping with the cost of equipment.

    Danny Boyle shot most of 28 Days later on a Canon XL-1, and in my opinion that movie LOOKS great! So gritty and grungy.

    The barriers to entry for into film are getting lower and lower. It’s not how high-end your gear is, it’s how strong your story is, how good your performances are.

    Personally, I would take a film with a strong story shot on a handy-cam over a film like Gigli shot on film any day of the week.

    Good topic tho, very polarizing.

    Trey Gregory
    ECG Productions – Atlanta
    HD Production and Post

    HOME

  • walter biscardi

    April 16, 2009 at 6:16 pm

    [Dan Asselin] “The reason I am writing this in the business forum is I want to ask people the following question. Have standards fallen so low that it makes no sense to even spend the money to go “all the way up” to a
    full 1920×1080 camera instead of HDV. “

    Shooting on HDV does not lower any standards. It’s how you use the camera and the footage to achieve the best storytelling. We’re using some HDV footage on three feature documentaries that are in post right now.

    Bad storytelling lowers standards, not any particular video / film format.

    Walter Biscardi, Jr.
    Biscardi Creative Media
    HD and SD Production for Broadcast and Independent Productions.

    Read my Blog!

    STOP STARING AND START GRADING WITH APPLE COLOR Apple Color Training DVD available now!

  • Andrew Kimery

    April 16, 2009 at 6:46 pm

    Not to sound like a dick (don’t you love it when people start off w/that?) but did you read the whole article to understand why they chose to use the cameras they did? Horses for courses. If they were going to shoot some epic period piece in 2.35:1 I don’t think they’d use small HDV cameras. But for the style and aesthetic they want for Crank the smaller cameras fit the bill. And as others have said it’s not what gear you use it’s how you use it. A few years ago the movie November, which was shot on a DVX100, won Best Cinematography at Sundance.

    -A

    3.2GHz 8-core, FCP 6.0.4, 10.5.5
    Blackmagic Multibridge Eclipse (6.8.1)

  • Nick Griffin

    April 16, 2009 at 6:47 pm

    [jon agnew] “It may not look like “The Last Emperor”, but the story was successful…and because it cost so little to make, it was a financial success as well.”

    [walter biscardi] “Bad storytelling lowers standards, not any particular video / film format.”

    More than a couple of times I have explained to those starting out that they need to be conscious of, and stick to, what they CAN do with what they HAVE to work with. You can’t have a smooth as silk crane shot descending from 75 feet in the air into the middle of the action if you don’t have a 75 foot Chapman or similar piece of hardware. Duh.

    Well you can’t expect to have the look of Discovery Channel’s Planet Earth from a DV camcorder either. But just as Jon and Walter point out, the storytelling needs to carry the project, not the equipment. In fact, the equipment and it’s limitations can sometimes help the project.

    Probably one of the better know examples of this The Blair Witch Project. It had the look of a handheld camcorder because it WAS shot with a handheld camcorder. The gear and its usage created the look which created the mood.

    The long and short of it is you have to match what you’ve got, or are getting… or yes, David renting (because that’s how people in Hollywood operate — not that there’s anything wrong with that)… with what you’re trying to do. The problems arise when there’s a mis-match.

  • Brendan Coots

    April 16, 2009 at 7:31 pm

    Yes the story should carry the story, but equally relevant here is that you choose the technology BASED ON THE STORY. Blair Witch, Rec and 28 Days Later all leveraged low end technology for authenticity’s sake and to place the audience uncomfortably close to the action. In contrast, The Transformers needed the precise and ultra-clean look of very high end gear because of the story and the intended audience.

    Brendan Coots
    Splitvision Digital
    http://www.splitvisiondigital.com

  • Dan Asselin

    April 17, 2009 at 2:37 am

    Like I said there is no real answer here…..but your comments are all exceptional. Just another day where I am glad there is a COW around

  • walter biscardi

    April 17, 2009 at 3:10 am

    [Nick Griffin] “Well you can’t expect to have the look of Discovery Channel’s Planet Earth from a DV camcorder either. But just as Jon and Walter point out, the storytelling needs to carry the project, not the equipment. In fact, the equipment and it’s limitations can sometimes help the project. “

    What’s interesting about that is I met one of the editors of that series and from he told me, Color Grading saved many of the shots in that series. Many did not look nearly as good out of the can or during the edit as they did after Color grading was done.

    We just completed a project recently that was all shot Z1U in India and they had some overblown white and just bad color issues on a lot of the footage. I did some serious color enhancement in Apple Color to completely change the look of the original footage into something that really helped tell the story.

    So even after the footage is shot, what you do with it in post can make or break the story.

    Walter Biscardi, Jr.
    Biscardi Creative Media
    HD and SD Production for Broadcast and Independent Productions.

    Read my Blog!

    STOP STARING AND START GRADING WITH APPLE COLOR Apple Color Training DVD available now!

Viewing 1 - 10 of 29 posts

Log in to reply.

We use anonymous cookies to give you the best experience we can.
Our Privacy policy | GDPR Policy