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  • Simon Ubsdell

    February 11, 2012 at 10:45 am

    Great post!

    [Mark Morache] “(I frequently connect clips, then use opt-cmd-down to overwrite them into the primary storyline.)”

    I’m interested to see that someone with your experience is doing this too – I find it a really good way of working that definitely gets the best out of the magnetic timeline. A clip stays floating and connected, almost in a transitional state, until you decide it definitely belongs as part of the spine of the edit and then you can upgrade it to the primary.

    I think generally the old 3-point editing paradigm is starting to look increasingly cumbersome and unnecessary for a lot of work. Doing a lot more editing in the timeline is a much quicker (and I think better) way of working and FCPX really moves this idea forward.

    Conversely I can’t seem to get friendly with fine-tuning edit points in the browser. Something about the interface just doesn’t “feel” right. I think the major factors is not having a long linear representation of the clip which we’ve always had before – a visual aid which for me was far more “tactile” and intuitive. The “filmstrip” mode seems to mean a lot more constant scrolling and zooming in and out, at least for me – too many keystrokes or mouse clicks. And that’s despite the convenience of the skimmer.

    Simon Ubsdell
    Director/Editor/Writer
    http://www.tokyo-uk.com

  • Mark Morache

    February 11, 2012 at 11:12 am

    [Simon Ubsdell] “A clip stays floating and connected, almost in a transitional state, until you decide it definitely belongs as part of the spine”

    I actually don’t like secondary storylines as much because I can’t use the keyboard to skim and set in/out points on secondary timelines. I hope that Apple can find a way to implement this. Seems like if I have a secondary storyline selected that hitting I/O and D would affect the secondary and not the primary.

    Meanwhile I connect a clip over the part of the timeline I want covered, overwrite the primary and create that L cut with the audio, and start editing and arranging the clips in the crook of the L cut. It works for me.

    [Simon Ubsdell] “Conversely I can’t seem to get friendly with fine-tuning edit points in the browser.”

    And it’s easier to edit with 100 separate clips in a bin? This is where the tagging and keywording comes in handy. A little bit of sorting makes things much easier to work with.

    I’d love to see a few small things implemented that would make this even more robust:

    >Give me the ability to hide used footage in the browser.
    >Give me keyboard shortcuts for different zoom views in the browser. I want to be able to snap to 10 sec and 5 sec views with a mouse click.
    >Remember my bin views. I’m happy with a single icon for still files. 5s and 10s for my tape footage. 2s for file tape clips. 30s for music clips. Etc.
    >I also want to see a way to skim through a browser clip without zig zagging back and forth over long clips.

    ———
    FCX. She tempts me, abuses me, beats me up, makes me feel worthless, then in the end she comes around, helps me get my work done, gives me hope and I can’t stop thinking about her.

    Mark Morache
    Avid/Xpri/FCP7/FCX
    Evening Magazine,Seattle, WA
    https://fcpx.wordpress.com

  • Simon Ubsdell

    February 11, 2012 at 12:35 pm

    [Mark Morache] “I actually don’t like secondary storylines as much because I can’t use the keyboard to skim and set in/out points on secondary timelines. I hope that Apple can find a way to implement this. Seems like if I have a secondary storyline selected that hitting I/O and D would affect the secondary and not the primary.”

    Totally agree – secondaries could be so much more useful if you could edit into them properly as you can with the primary. Also I would really, really like them to be able to behave more like compound clips so that you could add global transforms, effects, CC etc. This surely can’t be that hard to implement and would be a huge step forward.

    [Mark Morache] “And it’s easier to edit with 100 separate clips in a bin?”

    My point wasn’t about organizing but rather about the physical act of scrubbing around to find edit points – somehow it just doesn’t feel as comfortable with the filmstrip model as with as conventional one where you could see the clip as one long unbroken line from beginning to end.

    The space constraints of the browser mean that when you shrink the view down to see the whole of a clip, the length of the clip is represented very small.

    Often I will know that the bit I want (that I haven’t already logged for whatever reason) is pretty much exactly at the 80 minute mark ina 90 mminute clip. That’s a lot easier to find in a conventional NLE – at least for me.

    Maybe it’s something that will come to feel natural in time but whereas the rest of it is starting to feel really good this particular part isn’t doing it for me just yet.

    Simon Ubsdell
    Director/Editor/Writer
    http://www.tokyo-uk.com

  • Simon Ubsdell

    February 11, 2012 at 12:39 pm

    [Mark Morache] “I actually don’t like secondary storylines as much because I can’t use the keyboard to skim and set in/out points on secondary timelines. I hope that Apple can find a way to implement this. Seems like if I have a secondary storyline selected that hitting I/O and D would affect the secondary and not the primary.”

    Totally agree – secondaries could be so much more useful if you could edit into them properly as you can with the primary. Also I would really, really like them to be able to behave more like compound clips so that you could add global transforms, effects, CC etc. This surely can’t be that hard to implement and would be a huge step forward.

    [Mark Morache] “And it’s easier to edit with 100 separate clips in a bin?”

    My point wasn’t about organizing but rather about the physical act of scrubbing around to find edit points – somehow it just doesn’t feel as comfortable with the filmstrip model as with as conventional one where you could see the clip as one long unbroken line from beginning to end. The space constraints of the browser mean that when you shrink the view down to see the whole of a clip, the length of the clip is represented very small. Often I will know that the bit I want (that I haven’t already logged for whatever reason) is pretty much exactly at the

    [Mark Morache] “I’d love to see a few small things implemented that would make this even more robust:

    >Give me the ability to hide used footage in the browser.
    >Give me keyboard shortcuts for different zoom views in the browser. I want to be able to snap to 10 sec and 5 sec views with a mouse click.
    >Remember my bin views. I’m happy with a single icon for still files. 5s and 10s for my tape footage. 2s for file tape clips. 30s for music clips. Etc.
    >I also want to see a way to skim through a browser clip without zig zagging back and forth over long clips.”

    For some reason my eyes missed this part of your post, and actually yes all of these things are what I am looking for to make this aspect from usable – and faster. All really good ideas. I’ve always hated zooming in and out of stuff unnecessarily and the “broken filmstrip” mode really does aggravate this.

    Simon Ubsdell
    Director/Editor/Writer
    http://www.tokyo-uk.com

  • Alex Hawkins

    February 11, 2012 at 9:56 pm

    Thanks guys for your responses. Very informative.

    You’ve certainly given me food for thought and Mark I love your signature tagline but it would sure be nice to eventually not get beaten up…

    Many Thanks.

    Alex Hawkins
    Canberra, Australia

  • adam dewhirst

    February 12, 2012 at 11:42 pm

    “The timeline thing is the biggie though. To me a timeline is an open canvas where you ‘paint’. It should not be restrictive in any way at all. You decide where, when and how things go on it.”

    great description. this really resonates with how i feel about fcpx.

  • Steve Connor

    February 12, 2012 at 11:47 pm

    When you know how to use it the timeline in FCPX is not restrictive, you can “paint” all you want with it.

    Steve Connor
    “FCPX Agitator”
    Adrenalin Television

  • adam dewhirst

    February 13, 2012 at 12:27 am

    i know there is some truth in what you are saying and aim to make an effort to learn fcpx in more detail as i don’t really have a choice. when my macbook pro (2006) dies (soon) i’ll have to switch to the imac/fcpx from fcp 6. still, having done quite a few tutorials on fcpx already, for me, it is nowhere near as intuitive as fcpx, which is what is most important to me.

  • David Roth Weiss

    February 13, 2012 at 12:42 am

    [adam dewhirst] “when my macbook pro (2006) dies (soon) i’ll have to switch to the imac/fcpx from fcp 6. “

    Why?

    David Roth Weiss
    ProMax Systems
    Burbank
    DRW@ProMax.com
    http://www.ProMax.com

    David is a Creative COW contributing editor and a forum host of the Apple Final Cut Pro forum.

  • adam dewhirst

    February 13, 2012 at 1:16 am

    because the imac with fcpx has a later operating system that doesn’t support fcp 6. i heard their was a workaround in terms of installing the old os on a separate part of the harddrive but also read that that isn’t very good for the computer to do that.

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